Education, Medical, Undergraduate

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Introducing holism and complementary medicine into mainstream medical education provides many scientific, philosophical, and personal challenges. The growth of new knowledge always necessitates venturing into areas, which are, by definition, unknown, hence arise potential clashes of ideology, knowledge, evidence, interpretation, language, and personality. This paper outlines some of the experience and progress made at Monash University Victoria, Australia, in teaching this material in undergraduate medical education.

Author(s): 
Hassed, Craig S.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Alternative therapies are popular, and information about them should be included in the curricula of health profession schools. During 2000 to 2003, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine awarded five-year education grants to 14 health professions schools in the United States and to the American Medical Students Association Foundation. The purpose of the grants was to integrate evidence-based information about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into the curriculum.

Author(s): 
Marcus, Donald M.
McCullough, Laurence
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVES: To explore First Year medical students' rating of CAM therapies following a core teaching session. To determine the influence of student gender and previous experience of CAM and therapist/teacher gender and professional background on ratings. DESIGN: Survey; self-administered questionnaire following a teaching session. SETTING: First Year medical students Behavioural Science module CAM teaching session, University of Birmingham Medical School, UK. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty (71.0%) students completed a questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Greenfield, S. M.
Innes, M. A.
Allan, T. F.
Wearn, A. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: There is a growing need for students and practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine to gain experience with standardized data collection, patient outcomes measurement, and practice-based research. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a process for standardized data collection that could eventually be adopted for clinical, research, and quality assurance purposes. SETTINGS/LOCATION: The setting for this study was an acupuncture and Oriental medicine teaching clinic in Bloomington, Minnesota.

Author(s): 
Maiers, Michele
McKenzie, Eileen
Evans, Roni
McKenzie, Mark
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Alternative therapies are popular, and information about them should be included in the curricula of health profession schools. During 2000 to 2003, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine awarded five-year education grants to 14 health professions schools in the United States and to the American Medical Students Association Foundation. The purpose of the grants was to integrate evidence-based information about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into the curriculum.

Author(s): 
Marcus, Donald M.
McCullough, Laurence
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: There is a growing need for students and practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine to gain experience with standardized data collection, patient outcomes measurement, and practice-based research. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a process for standardized data collection that could eventually be adopted for clinical, research, and quality assurance purposes. SETTINGS/LOCATION: The setting for this study was an acupuncture and Oriental medicine teaching clinic in Bloomington, Minnesota.

Author(s): 
Maiers, Michele
McKenzie, Eileen
Evans, Roni
McKenzie, Mark
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Alternative therapies are popular, and information about them should be included in the curricula of health profession schools. During 2000 to 2003, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine awarded five-year education grants to 14 health professions schools in the United States and to the American Medical Students Association Foundation. The purpose of the grants was to integrate evidence-based information about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into the curriculum.

Author(s): 
Marcus, Donald M.
McCullough, Laurence
Publication Title: 
Family Medicine

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Surgeons General, the Institute of Medicine, and others have called for physicians to be role models for meeting the obesity epidemic. There are few published reports describing undergraduate medical education obesity curriculum elements. Physician experiences, knowledge, and attitudes have been shown to affect patient counseling behavior of physicians. METHODS: Required and extra credit obesity educational interventions were designed for third-year family medicine clerkship.

Author(s): 
Schmidt, Susan
Rice, Austin
Kolasa, Kathryn
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Changes in the health care environment are putting increasing pressure on medical schools to make faculty accountable and to document the quality of the medical education they provide. Faculty's ratings of students' performances and students' ratings of faculty's teaching are important elements in these efforts to document educational quality.

Author(s): 
Albanese, M.
Publication Title: 
Rural and Remote Health

INTRODUCTION: The Rural Undergraduate Support and Coordination program funds medical schools to provide all medical students some time in rural Australia throughout their course. The University of Adelaide has developed a rural week program for both first and second year students to fulfill part of this objective. METHODS: First year students' rural week is an introduction to a range of rural health issues, Indigenous culture and rural lifestyle issues.

Author(s): 
Newbury, Jonathan W.
Shannon, Susan
Ryan, Vanessa
Whitrow, Melissa

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