Egypt

Publication Title: 
Liver International: Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The prevention and control of HCV infection is complex and challenging in terms of describing risk factors and modes of transmission. This meta-analysis was conducted to summarize the best available data on HCV risk factors worldwide and in Egypt. METHODS: Through exhaustive literature searches (1989-2013) of HCV risk factors, 357 original eligible articles were included in this study.

Author(s): 
El-Ghitany, Engy Mohamed
Abdel Wahab, Moataza M.
Abd El-Wahab, Ekram W.
Hassouna, Safaa
Farghaly, Azza G.
Publication Title: 
Chemical & Pharmaceutical Bulletin

Extracts of 41 medicinal plants used in Egyptian folk medicine were screened for their inhibitory effects on human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase. The extracts of fruits of Phyllanthus emblica, Quercus pedunculata, Rumex cyprius, Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia horrida showed significant inhibitory activity with IC50 < or = 50 micrograms/ml. Through a bioassay guided-fractionation of the methanol extract of the fruit of P.

Author(s): 
el-Mekkawy, S.
Meselhy, M. R.
Kusumoto, I. T.
Kadota, S.
Hattori, M.
Namba, T.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

The Taylor-Schechter (T-S) collection at Cambridge University Library is the biggest of all Cairo Genizah collections in the world. The importance and the potential of research into the medical aspects of the Genizah documents were clear to researcher since the early 1960s. A few works have been published since, usually focusing on one subject, or even important single manuscripts.

Author(s): 
Lev, Efraim
Amar, Zohar
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

The importance of the Genizah for the research of the medieval Mediterranean communities, supplying information on almost every aspect of life, is well known among historian. Less known is that pharmacy was the most popular of all branches of the healing art in the medieval Jewish community of Cairo, according to the Genizah manuscripts. Sources for study of medieval practical drugs are extremely rare since most records naturally vanish over the years, and only some medical books, which contained theoretical pharmacology, have survived to the present day.

Author(s): 
Lev, Efraim
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

AIM OF THE STUDY: To asses the scientific value of the practical medical fragments found in the Cairo Genizah (10th century), as a useful source for ethnopharmacological purposes (in exposing rare and usually inaccessible original medieval practical knowledge of medicinal substances to present-day researchers), and to reconstruct the practical drugs and their uses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A methodology distinguishing between theoretical (about 1500 fragments) and practical medical knowledge (about 230 fragments) was created and used.

Author(s): 
Lev, Efraim
Amar, Zohar
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Egyptians recognized the healing power of herbs and used them in their medicinal formulations. Nowadays, "Attarin" drug shops and the public use mainly the Unani medicinal system for treatment of their health problems including improvement of memory and old age related diseases. Numerous medicinal plants have been described in old literature of Arabic traditional medicine for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (or to strengthen memory).

Author(s): 
Ali, Shereen K.
Hamed, Ahmed R.
Soltan, Maha M.
Hegazy, Usama M.
Elgorashi, Esameldin E.
El-Garf, Ibrahim A.
Hussein, Ahmed A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Tropical spices have long been utilized in traditional medicine and cuisine. New archaeological evidence highlights temporal changes in the nature and scale of the ancient spice trade and in the ancient usage of these plants. Furthermore, a study of their 'materiality' highlights that the impact of spices extends beyond their material properties. Here the botanical remains of spices recovered from archaeological excavations at a port active in the Roman and medieval Islamic spice trade are evaluated.

Author(s): 
Van der Veen, Marijke
Morales, Jacob
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology

The idea that putrefaction of the stools causes disease, i.e., intestinal autointoxication, originated with physicians in ancient Egypt. They believed that a putrefactive principle associated with feces was absorbed in to the general circulation, where it acted to produce fever and pus. This description of the materia peccans represented the earliest forerunner of our present notion of endotoxin and its effect.

Author(s): 
Chen, T. S.
Chen, P. S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Vector Borne Diseases

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: In Egypt, Phlebotomus papatasi is the main vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In nature, P. papatasi feeds on blood from different hosts and sucrose (other sugars) mainly from fig fruits. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of three food regimes on the life table parameters of females mainly the life expectancy as a factor determining the fly's capability for Leishmania transmission.

Author(s): 
Abdel-Hamid, Yousrya M.
Publication Title: 
Scientific American
Author(s): 
Pringle, Heather

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