Eicosanoids

Publication Title: 
PloS One

The aging phenotype in humans has been thoroughly studied but a detailed metabolic profiling capable of shading light on the underpinning biological processes of longevity is still missing. Here using a combined metabonomics approach compromising holistic (1)H-NMR profiling and targeted MS approaches, we report for the first time the metabolic phenotype of longevity in a well characterized human aging cohort compromising mostly female centenarians, elderly, and young individuals.

Author(s): 
Collino, Sebastiano
Montoliu, Ivan
Martin, FranÁois-Pierre J.
Scherer, Max
Mari, Daniela
Salvioli, Stefano
Bucci, Laura
Ostan, Rita
Monti, Daniela
Biagi, Elena
Brigidi, Patrizia
Franceschi, Claudio
Rezzi, Serge
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The aging phenotype in humans has been thoroughly studied but a detailed metabolic profiling capable of shading light on the underpinning biological processes of longevity is still missing. Here using a combined metabonomics approach compromising holistic (1)H-NMR profiling and targeted MS approaches, we report for the first time the metabolic phenotype of longevity in a well characterized human aging cohort compromising mostly female centenarians, elderly, and young individuals.

Author(s): 
Collino, Sebastiano
Montoliu, Ivan
Martin, FranÁois-Pierre J.
Scherer, Max
Mari, Daniela
Salvioli, Stefano
Bucci, Laura
Ostan, Rita
Monti, Daniela
Biagi, Elena
Brigidi, Patrizia
Franceschi, Claudio
Rezzi, Serge
Publication Title: 
Food and Chemical Toxicology: An International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association

The French paradox is a dietary anomaly which has focused attention on the Mediterranean diet. Epidemiological studies revealed that this diet, replete in flavonoid-rich foods (Allium and Brassica vegetables, and red wine), correlated with the increased longevity and decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease seen in these populations. The most frequently studied flavonoid, quercetin, has been shown to have biological properties consistent with its sparing effect on the cardiovascular system.

Author(s): 
Formica, J. V.
Regelson, W.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American College of Nutrition

The purported health benefits of low-carbohydrate diets have been advocated intermittently over the last century and have enjoyed increasing popularity over the last decade. Although most revolve around the emphatic theme that carbohydrates are to blame for many chronic diseases, their specific ideologies are more variable and in some cases quite sophisticated. The Zone Diet phenomenon represents a new generation of modern low carbohydrate food fad with sales placing it among the most popular diet books in recent history.

Author(s): 
Cheuvront, Samuel N.
Publication Title: 
Nature Communications

The growing availability of 'omics' data and high-quality in silico genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) provide a golden opportunity for the systematic identification of new metabolic drug targets. Extant GSMM-based methods aim at identifying drug targets that would kill the target cell, focusing on antibiotics or cancer treatments. However, normal human metabolism is altered in many diseases and the therapeutic goal is fundamentally different--to retrieve the healthy state. Here we present a generic metabolic transformation algorithm (MTA) addressing this issue.

Author(s): 
Yizhak, Keren
Gabay, Orshay
Cohen, Haim
Ruppin, Eytan
Publication Title: 
Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids

In traditional medicine, Ayurveda, several spices and herbs are held to possess medicinal properties. Earlier we have reported that extracts from several spices, including turmeric, inhibit platelet aggregation and modulate eicosanoid biosynthesis. Due to their eicosanoid-modulating property, it was suggested that the spices may serve to provide clues to drugs directed to arachidonic acid (AA) pathway enzymes as pharmacological targets. Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, inhibited platelet aggregation induced by arachidonate, adrenaline and collagen.

Author(s): 
Srivastava, K. C.
Bordia, A.
Verma, S. K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)

Glucose serves as the major energy substrate and the main precursor for the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans in chondrocytes. Facilitated glucose transport represents the first rate-limiting step in glucose metabolism. This study examines molecular regulation of facilitated glucose transport in normal human articular chondrocytes by proinflammatory cytokines. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, and to a lesser degree IL-6, accelerate facilitated glucose transport as measured by [(3)H]2-deoxyglucose uptake.

Author(s): 
Shikhman, A. R.
Brinson, D. C.
Valbracht, J.
Lotz, M. K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Lipid Research

The objective of this study was to determine whether 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene variants associated with cardiovascular disease affect eicosanoid production by monocytes. The study was a randomized, double-masked, parallel intervention trial with fish oil (5.0 g of fish oil daily, containing 2.0 g of eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and 1.0 g of docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) or placebo oil (5.0 g of corn/soy mixture). A total of 116 subjects (68% female, 20-59 years old) of African American ancestry enrolled, and 98 subjects completed the study.

Author(s): 
Stephensen, Charles B.
Armstrong, Patrice
Newman, John W.
Pedersen, Theresa L.
Legault, Jillian
Schuster, Gertrud U.
Kelley, Darshan
Vikman, Susanna
Hartiala, Jaana
Nassir, Rami
Seldin, Michael F.
Allayee, Hooman
Publication Title: 
Antiviral Therapy

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk can be underestimated in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Novel CVD risk markers in this population are needed. We hypothesized that eicosanoid metabolite production is increased with metabolic complications of ART. Our objective was to determine relationships between urine eicosanoids and traditional CVD risk factors in a cohort of HIV-infected persons receiving ART.

Author(s): 
Boger, Michael S.
Bian, Aihua
Shintani, Ayumi
Milne, Ginger L.
Morrow, Jason D.
Erdem, Husamettin
Mitchell, Valerie
Haas, David W.
Hulgan, Todd
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology

Glycemic regulation improves myocardial function in diabetic patients, but finding optimal therapeutic strategies remains challenging. Recent data have shown that pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), an enzyme that decreases the endogenous levels of protective epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), improves glucose homeostasis in insulin-resistant mice. Here, we tested whether the administration of sEH inhibitors preserves cardiac myocyte structure and function in hyperglycemic rats.

Author(s): 
Guglielmino, Kathleen
Jackson, Kaleena
Harris, Todd R.
Vu, Vincent
Dong, Hua
Dutrow, Gavin
Evans, James E.
Graham, James
Cummings, Bethany P.
Havel, Peter J.
Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan
Despa, Sanda
Hammock, Bruce D.
Despa, Florin
Subscribe to RSS - Eicosanoids