Electric Impedance

Publication Title: 
Bioelectromagnetics

According to conventional wisdom within the acupuncture community, acupuncture points and meridians are special conduits for electrical signals. This view gained popularity after anecdotal reports and clinical studies asserted that these anatomical structures are characterized by lower electrical impedance compared to adjacent controls. To ascertain whether evidence exists to support or refute this claim, we conducted a systematic review of studies directly evaluating the electrical characteristics of acupuncture structures and appropriate controls.

Author(s): 
Ahn, Andrew C.
Colbert, Agatha P.
Anderson, Belinda J.
Martinsen, Orjan G.
Hammerschlag, Richard
Cina, Steve
Wayne, Peter M.
Langevin, Helene M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases

BACKGROUND: Central to the pathologic progression of human cerebral malaria (CM) is sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (Pf-IRBCs) to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelium. The molecular interactions between Pf-IRBCs and the BBB endothelium and their implications for barrier function are unclear. METHODS: The effects of Pf-IRBCs on the integrity of the BBB were assessed by electrical cell substrate sensing and by transendothelial electrical resistance measurements in an in vitro human BBB model.

Author(s): 
Tripathi, Abhai K.
Sullivan, David J.
Stins, Monique F.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences: Official Journal of the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences

Traditionally Boswellia serrata extract is used in the Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In 2002 the EMEA designated Boswellia an orphan drug status for the treatment of peritumoral oedema. Pharmacokinetic studies yielded low plasma concentrations of the active ingredients 11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (KBA) and 3-acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA). In continuation of the tests investigating the factors limiting bioavailability of boswellic acids, the present study examined the permeability of KBA and AKBA in human Caco-2 cell lines.

Author(s): 
Krüger, Phillip
Kanzer, Johanna
Hummel, Jessica
Fricker, Gert
Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred
Abdel-Tawab, Mona
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Acupuncture points and meridians are commonly believed to possess unique electrical properties. The experimental support for this claim is limited given the technical and methodological shortcomings of prior studies. Recent studies indicate a correspondence between acupuncture meridians and connective tissue planes.

Author(s): 
Ahn, Andrew C.
Wu, Junru
Badger, Gary J.
Hammerschlag, Richard
Langevin, Helene M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Acupuncture points are frequently described as having distinct electrical properties. These properties include increased conductance, reduced impedance and resistance, increased capacitance, and elevated electrical potential compared to adjacent nonacupuncture points. Commercial electrodiagnostic devices have used this assertion as a means to localize and analyze acupuncture points for diagnostic purposes. Yet, the electrical characterization of acupuncture points is associated with important technical issues that are often overlooked.

Author(s): 
Ahn, Andrew C.
Martinsen, Orjan G.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: The scientific basis for acupuncture meridians is unknown. Past studies have suggested that acupuncture meridians are physiologically characterized by low electrical impedance and anatomically associated with connective tissue planes. We are interested in seeing whether acupuncture meridians are associated with lower electrical impedance and whether ultrasound-derived measures--specifically echogenic collagenous bands--can account for these impedance differences.

Author(s): 
Ahn, Andrew C.
Park, Min
Shaw, Jessica R.
McManus, Claire A.
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Langevin, Helene M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Biological Chemistry

The impermeant nature of the intestinal barrier is maintained by tight junctions (TJs) formed between adjacent intestinal epithelial cells. Disruption of TJs and loss of barrier function are associated with a number of gastrointestinal diseases, including neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), the leading cause of death from gastrointestinal diseases in preterm infants. Human milk is protective against NEC, and the human milk factor erythropoietin (Epo) has been shown to protect endothelial cell-cell and blood-brain barriers.

Author(s): 
Shiou, Sheng-Ru
Yu, Yueyue
Chen, Sangzi
Ciancio, Mae J.
Petrof, Elaine O.
Sun, Jun
Claud, Erika C.
Publication Title: 
Bioelectromagnetics

The reason for using acupuncture points as exposure sites in some applications of millimeter wave therapy has been unclear. Acupuncture points have been suspected to exhibit particular direct current (DC), low-frequency electrical and optical properties compared to surrounding skin. To assess if such a biophysical correlation could exist at millimeter wave frequencies used in the therapy, we investigated the dielectric properties of an acupuncture point on the forearm skin within the 50-75 GHz range.

Author(s): 
Egot-Lemaire, Stéphane J.-P.
Ziskin, Marvin C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Hypertension

OBJECTIVE: Input impedance is the frequency-dependent afterload to pulsatile blood flow. Studies of input impedance have been performed as early as the 1960s and have been applied to hypertension (HTN). However, to date, these studies have not been systematically evaluated. This systematic review aims to summarize the literature, interpret existing data from the perspective of impedance theory, and to discuss their potential for generating physiological insights into HTN.

Author(s): 
Li, Weihui
Ahn, Andrew C.
Publication Title: 
Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)

OBJECTIVES: To (1) evaluate the relationships between several indices of obesity with obesity-related risk factors; (2) compare the accuracy of body composition estimates derived from anthropometry and bioimpedance analysis (BIA) to estimates of body composition assessed by doubly-labeled water (DLW); and (3) establish equations for estimating fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), and percent body fat (PBF) in Yup'ik people. DESIGN AND METHODS: Participants included 1,056 adult Yup'ik people from 11 communities in Southwestern Alaska.

Author(s): 
Bray, Maria
Pomeroy, Jeremy
Knowler, William C.
Bersamin, Andrea
Hopkins, Scarlett
Brage, Søren
Stanhope, Kimber
Havel, Peter J.
Boyer, Bert B.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Electric Impedance