Emergency Medicine

Publication Title: 
Emergency medicine Australasia: EMA

Acupuncture might offer a novel approach to improve ED pain management. Our primary aim was to assess the efficacy of acupuncture in the emergency setting while secondary objectives were to explore its suitability through its side-effect profile, patient satisfaction, cost, administration time and points used. Seven databases and Google Scholar were searched up to 31 July 2016 using MeSH descriptors for three overarching themes concerning acupuncture, pain management and emergency medicine.

Author(s): 
Jan, Andrew L.
Aldridge, Emogene S.
Rogers, Ian R.
Visser, Eric J.
Bulsara, Max K.
Niemtzow, Richard C.
Publication Title: 
Contraception

OBJECTIVES: For female emergency department (ED) patients, we sought to assess the prevalence of contraceptive usage as well as the extent of contraceptive knowledge and to determine if demographic and sexual health history factors, comprehension of contraceptive methods and moral/religious opinions on contraception were associated with current usage of birth control pills (BCPs), prior usage of emergency contraception (EC) and frequency of condom usage.

Author(s): 
Merchant, Roland C.
Damergis, Jennifer A.
Gee, Erin M.
Bock, Beth C.
Becker, Bruce M.
Clark, Melissa A.
Publication Title: 
MMWR supplements

The need for enhanced biologic surveillance has led to the search for new sources of data. Beginning in September 2001, Emergency Medical Associates (EMA) of New Jersey, an emergency physician group practice, undertook a series of surveillance projects in collaboration with state and federal agencies. This paper examines EMA's motivations and concerns and discusses the collaborative opportunities available to data suppliers for syndromic surveillance.

Author(s): 
Cochrane, Dennis G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

Emergency departments are challenging research settings, where truly informed consent can be difficult to obtain. A deeper understanding of emergency medical patients' opinions about research is needed. We conducted a systematic review and meta-summary of quantitative and qualitative studies on which values, attitudes, or beliefs of emergent medical research participants influence research participation. We included studies of adults that investigated opinions toward emergency medicine research participation.

Author(s): 
Limkakeng, Alexander T.
de Oliveira, Lucas Lentini Herling
Moreira, Tais
Phadtare, Amruta
Garcia Rodrigues, Clarissa
Hocker, Michael B.
McKinney, Ross
Voils, Corrine I.
Pietrobon, Ricardo
Publication Title: 
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America

One primary reason patients go to emergency departments is for pain relief. Understanding the physiologic dynamics of pain, pharmacologic methods for treatment of pain, as well CAM therapies used in treatment of pain is important to all providers in emergency care. Asking patients about self-care and treatments used outside of the emergency department is an important part of the patient history. Complementary and alternative therapies are very popular for painful conditions despite the lack of strong research supporting some of their use.

Author(s): 
Dillard, James N.
Knapp, Sharon
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Emergency Medicine

BACKGROUND: Hypnosis has been used in medicine for nearly 250 years. Yet, emergency clinicians rarely use it in emergency departments or prehospital settings. OBJECTIVE: This review describes hypnosis, its historical use in medicine, several neurophysiologic studies of the procedure, its uses and potential uses in emergency care, and a simple technique for inducing hypnosis. It also discusses reasons why the technique has not been widely adopted, and suggests methods of increasing its use in emergency care, including some potential research areas.

Author(s): 
Iserson, Kenneth V.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to find out which experiences adults are making while treating children with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in German-speaking Switzerland. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: A cross-sectional survey was performed on adults accompanying the children presenting to an urban, tertiary pediatric emergency department in Zurich; 71% of the distributed questionnaires (1143 of 1600) could be used for data analysis.

Author(s): 
Zuzak, Tycho Jan
Zuzak-Siegrist, Isabelle
Rist, Lukas
Staubli, Georg
Simões-Wüst, Ana Paula
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to find out which experiences adults are making while treating children with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in German-speaking Switzerland. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: A cross-sectional survey was performed on adults accompanying the children presenting to an urban, tertiary pediatric emergency department in Zurich; 71% of the distributed questionnaires (1143 of 1600) could be used for data analysis.

Author(s): 
Zuzak, Tycho Jan
Zuzak-Siegrist, Isabelle
Rist, Lukas
Staubli, Georg
Simões-Wüst, Ana Paula
Publication Title: 
Prehospital and Disaster Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To assess the religious spirituality of EMS personnel and their perception of the spiritual needs of ambulance patients. METHODS: Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics presenting to an urban, academic emergency department (ED) were asked to complete a three-part survey relating to demographics, personal practices, and perceived patient needs. Their responses were compared to those of ambulance patients presenting to an ED during a previous study period and administered a similar survey. RESULTS: A total of 143 EMTs and 89 paramedics returned the surveys.

Author(s): 
Jang, Timothy
Kryder, George D.
Char, Douglas
Howell, Randy
Primrose, Joseph
Tan, David
Publication Title: 
Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America

One primary reason patients go to emergency departments is for pain relief. Understanding the physiologic dynamics of pain, pharmacologic methods for treatment of pain, as well CAM therapies used in treatment of pain is important to all providers in emergency care. Asking patients about self-care and treatments used outside of the emergency department is an important part of the patient history. Complementary and alternative therapies are very popular for painful conditions despite the lack of strong research supporting some of their use.

Author(s): 
Dillard, James N.
Knapp, Sharon

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