Emigration and Immigration

Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Because migration is such a widespread phenomenon, studies of the effects of accompanying life change on the health and well-being of the migrant have special significance in areas like California that support large migrant communities. Previous studies have shown that increased weight and elevated blood pressure may be linked to changes in diet, exercise habits, and the altered sociocultural milieu of the migrant.

Author(s): 
Pawson, I. G.
Janes, G.
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

The health (self-reported health conditions) and nutritional status (food and nutrient intake, nutritional biochemistry, anthropometry) of 189 elderly Greeks living in Melbourne, Australia were described and compared with 104 elderly Greeks living in a rural town in Greece (Spata) using a validated health and food frequency questionnaire. Spata was chosen because the traditional diet is maintained by the community and may act as a 'surrogate' measure of diets prevalent in Greece prior to the Melbourne sample's migration to Australia in the 1960s.

Author(s): 
Kouris-Blazos, A.
Wahlqvist, M. L.
Trichopoulou, A.
Polychronopoulos, E.
Trichopoulos, D.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging

Developing countries face the double menace of still prevalent infectious diseases and increasing cardiovascular disease (CVD) with epidemic proportions in the near future, linked to demographic changes (expansion and ageing), and to urbanisation and lifestyle modifications. It is estimated that the elderly population will increase globally (over 80% during the next 25 years), with a large share of this rise in the developing world because of expanding populations. Increasing longevity prolongs the time exposure to risk factors, resulting in a greater probability of CVD.

Author(s): 
Dominguez, L. J.
Galioto, A.
Ferlisi, A.
Pineo, A.
Putignano, E.
Belvedere, M.
Costanza, G.
Barbagallo, M.
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

European researchers have observed that schizophrenia is 3 times more frequent in immigrants than in native-born subjects. This increased risk is even higher in dark-skinned immigrants, and the second generation is more affected than the first one. Immigrant status is an important environmental risk factor not only for schizophrenia but also for other psychoses. The explanations proposed to date have been mainly related to epidemiological biases and psychological reasons, such as racism or social defeat, but no biological hypotheses have been tested so far.

Author(s): 
Dealberto, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

In common with some other ethnic and religious minorities whose forebears migrated from their country of origin, Irish Catholics in Britain are less well off than the host population in terms of socio-economic position and health. Results are presented from a Scottish study, where Catholic religion of origin mainly indicates Irish ancestry, and it is estimated that about one-third of the population is of significant Irish descent.

Author(s): 
Abbotts, J.
Williams, R.
Ford, G.
Publication Title: 
Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry

Agonias, meaning "the agonies," is a culture-specific somatic phenomenon experienced by Azorean immigrants. Although the community's health providers conceptualize agonias as an "anxiety disorder," interviews with community members revealed a more complex phenomenon. For them, agonias is a somatomoral experience--where the somatic, the social, the religious and the moral are inextricably linked.

Author(s): 
James, Susan
Publication Title: 
Sociology of Health & Illness

This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options.

Author(s): 
Walls, Patricia
Williams, Rory
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Despite increased security, immigrants continue to enter the United States, most without resources to address health needs. That is the case in and around Richmond, VA, where a quickly growing immigrant population has become a priority for Bon Secours Richmond Health System (BSR), a member of Bon Secours Health System (BSHS), Marriottsville, MD. To plan for the impact of immigrants on community health resources, BSR's Office of Community Health Services in August 2002 brought together local health and human service providers, as well as community groups.

Author(s): 
Cameron, Karen
Hansen, Eletta
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Founded in 2001 by representatives of seven local organizations, the Refugee Healthcare Partnership (RHP) provides necessary health services and meaningful employment opportunities for refugees in the Tampa Bay, FL, area. Spearheaded by Catholic health care organizations and Catholic Charities of the Diocese of St. Petersburg, the RHP was made possible initially by funding from the Bon Secours Mission Fund of Bon Secours Health System, Marriottsville, MD. Florida leads the nation in granting lawful permanent resident status to refugees and asylum seekers.

Author(s): 
Stovall, Carol E. Sister
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Many studies are now documenting the circumstances of people living with HIV/AIDS in different parts of the world. We know an increasing amount about the experiences of women who make up the majority of those infected in countries in sub-Saharan Africa. However, very few researchers have examined the lives of female migrants from the region living with HIV. This article begins to fill that gap by exploring the situation of 62 women from different parts of Africa receiving treatment from the National Health Service in London.

Author(s): 
Doyal, Lesley
Anderson, Jane

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