Emollients

Publication Title: 
Paediatric Drugs

Eczema in childhood is almost always atopic eczema, a common disease with huge impact on the quality of life of the child and family. Although atopic eczema constitutes part of the atopic syndrome, avoidance of allergens is never enough for disease control. Treatment of eczema in childhood has the same components as in adults. Emollients constitute the preventive background therapy in all stages of eczema, and topical corticosteroids are still the mainstay of treatment. Infectious exacerbation may require the use of a short course of topical or systemic antimicrobials.

Author(s): 
Granlund, Håkan
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

Atopic dermatitis, also known as atopic eczema, is a chronic pruritic skin condition affecting approximately 17.8 million persons in the United States. It can lead to significant morbidity. A simplified version of the U.K. Working Party's Diagnostic Criteria can help make the diagnosis. Asking about the presence and frequency of symptoms can allow physicians to grade the severity of the disease and response to treatment. Management consists of relieving symptoms and lengthening time between flare-ups. Regular, liberal use of emollients is recommended.

Author(s): 
Berke, Rebecca
Singh, Arshdeep
Guralnick, Mark
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Family Practice

Emollients are effective first-line treatment to decrease symptoms of eczema and reduce the need to use steroids in children. Tar preparations work, but compliance may be limited. Gamma-linoleic acid preparations, borage oil, and evening primrose oil show efficacy in small studies. MAS063DP cream (Atopiclair) is effective. Chamomile and bathing in acidic hot spring water may be effective, but these treatments have not been adequately evaluated. Wet wrap dressings may be effective but increase the risk of skin infections.

Author(s): 
Yates, Jennifer E.
Phifer, Jennifer B.
Flake, Donna
Publication Title: 
Pediatric Dermatology

Young children with atopic dermatitis were treated with standard topical care and massaged by their parents for 20 minutes daily for a 1 month period. A control group received standard topical care only. The children's affect and activity level significantly improved, and their parent's anxiety decreased immediately after the massage therapy sessions.

Author(s): 
Schachner, L.
Field, T.
Hernandez-Reif, M.
Duarte, A. M.
Krasnegor, J.
Publication Title: 
Paediatric Drugs

Eczema in childhood is almost always atopic eczema, a common disease with huge impact on the quality of life of the child and family. Although atopic eczema constitutes part of the atopic syndrome, avoidance of allergens is never enough for disease control. Treatment of eczema in childhood has the same components as in adults. Emollients constitute the preventive background therapy in all stages of eczema, and topical corticosteroids are still the mainstay of treatment. Infectious exacerbation may require the use of a short course of topical or systemic antimicrobials.

Author(s): 
Granlund, Håkan
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health, Population, and Nutrition

Oil massage of newborns has been practised for generations in the Indian sub-continent; however, oils may vary from potentially beneficial, e.g. sunflower seed oil, to potentially toxic, e.g. mustard oil. The study was carried out to gain insights into oil-massage practices and acceptability of skin barrier-enhancing emollients in young, preterm Bangladeshi neonates. Preterm infants of <33 weeks gestational age were randomized to high-linoleate sunflower seed oil, Aquaphor Original Emollient Ointment, or the comparison group (usual care).

Author(s): 
Ahmed, A. S. M. Nawshad Uddin
Saha, Samir K.
Chowdhury, M. A. K. Azad
Law, Paul A.
Black, Robert E.
Santosham, Mathuram
Darmstadt, Gary L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Wound Care
Author(s): 
Hallam, M.-J.
Shirley, R.
Dheansa, B.
Coker, O.
Publication Title: 
Georgian Medical News

Traditionally, the exacerbation of skin diseases accompanied by itching and dryness is cutting off by using of antihistamines, indifferent ointment (sometimes together with topical corticosteroids) and antipruritic local means. For the continuous application in inter-relapsing period, patients, as a rule, are offered variety of lipid-recovery beauty creams, ointments and emulsions. At the same time, such measures do not have a significant impact on the severity of itching and the cost of these drugs is quite high.

Author(s): 
Tsiskarishvili, N. V.
Eradze, M. Sh
Tsiskarishvili, Ts I.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Tropical Pediatrics

Infections and complications from prematurity cause a majority of global neonatal deaths. Recent evidence has demonstrated the life-saving ability of topical emollient therapy in resource-poor settings. With the potential to reduce infection and neonatal mortality by 41 and 26%, respectively, emollient therapy is a promising option for improving newborn care. While application of oil to the newborn is nearly universal in South Asia, little is known about this behavior in Africa.

Author(s): 
Duffy, Jean L.
Ferguson, Rebecca M.
Darmstadt, Gary L.
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

Atopic dermatitis, also known as atopic eczema, is a chronic pruritic skin condition affecting approximately 17.8 million persons in the United States. It can lead to significant morbidity. A simplified version of the U.K. Working Party's Diagnostic Criteria can help make the diagnosis. Asking about the presence and frequency of symptoms can allow physicians to grade the severity of the disease and response to treatment. Management consists of relieving symptoms and lengthening time between flare-ups. Regular, liberal use of emollients is recommended.

Author(s): 
Berke, Rebecca
Singh, Arshdeep
Guralnick, Mark

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Emollients