Escherichia coli

Publication Title: 
Phytotherapy research: PTR

Screening was done of some plants of importance in the Ayurvedic system of traditional medicine used in India to treat enteric diseases. Fifty four plant extracts (methanol and aqueous) were assayed for their activity against multi-drug resistant Salmonella typhi. Strong antibacterial activity was shown by the methanol extracts of Aegle marmelos, Salmalia malabarica, Punica granatum, Myristica fragrans, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Terminalia arjuna and Triphal (mixture of Emblica of fi cinalis, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia belerica).

Author(s): 
Rani, Phulan
Khullar, Neeraj
Publication Title: 
Journal of Food Protection

The growth-inhibitory activity of materials derived from the fruit of Terminalia chebula was evaluated against six intestinal bacteria by means of an impregnated paper disk agar diffusion method. The butanol fraction of T. chebula extract had profound growth-inhibitory activity at a concentration of 5 mg per disk. The biologically active component isolated from the T. chebula fruits was identified with a variety of spectroscopic analyses as ethanedioic acid. The growth responses varied in accordance with the bacterial strain, chemical, and dosage tested.

Author(s): 
Kim, H. G.
Cho, J. H.
Jeong, E. Y.
Lim, J. H.
Lee, S. H.
Lee, H. S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Natural Medicines

Antibacterial activity of hot aqueous and methanolic extracts prepared from six plants (Terminallia chebula, Terminallia bellerica, Phyllanthus emblica, Punica granatum, Lawsonia alba and Mikania micrantha) used in traditional folk medicines of India were screened against five pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 2940, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 441, Escherichia coli MTCC 739, Proteus vulgaris MTCC 426 and Enterobacter aerogenes MTCC 111). The highest antibacterial potentiality was exhibited by the methanolic leaf extract of T. chebula, followed by the aqueous fruit extract of T.

Author(s): 
Ghosh, Anupam
Das, Bidus Kanti
Roy, Arup
Mandal, Biplab
Chandra, Goutam
Publication Title: 
Pakistan journal of biological sciences: PJBS

The antibacterial activity of acetone, hexane, dichloromethane leaf extract of five Terminalia species (Terminalia alata Heyne ex Roth., Terminalia arjuna (Roxb.) Wt. and Am., Terminalia bellerica (Gaertn.) Roxb., Terminalia catappa L. and Terminalia chebula Retz.) were tested by Agar-well-diffusion method against human pathogens E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The Rf values and relative activities of separated compounds were tested.

Author(s): 
Shinde, S. L.
Junne, S. B.
Wadje, S. S.
Baig, M. M. V.
Publication Title: 
Spectrochimica Acta. Part A, Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy

Biologically inspired experimental process in synthesising nanoparticles is of great interest in present scenario. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered to be one of the best green techniques in synthesising metal nanoparticles. Here, an in situ green biogenic synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula as reducing and stabilizing agent is reported. Gold nanoparticles were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance in the range of 535 nm using UV-visible spectrometry.

Author(s): 
Kumar, Kesarla Mohan
Mandal, Badal Kumar
Sinha, Madhulika
Krishnakumar, Varadhan
Publication Title: 
Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin

Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) causes inflammation in multiple organs of chickens called avian colibacillosis, and results in serious economic loss to the chicken industry. Polyphenolic compounds possess a wide range of physiological activities that may contribute to their beneficial effects against inflammation-related diseases. In this study, the curative effect and mechanism of action of the polyphenolic extracts from Punica granatum L. and Terminalia chebula Retz. in chickens challenged with APEC were studied.

Author(s): 
Zhong, Xinlu
Shi, Yaran
Chen, Jiajia
Xu, Jianqing
Wang, Lei
Beier, Ross C.
Hou, Xiaolin
Liu, Fenghua
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has in recent years been proven to be a powerful in vivo model for testing antimicrobial compounds. We report here that the alkaloid compound Harmane (2-methyl-?-carboline) increases the lifespan of nematodes infected with a human pathogen, the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and several other bacterial pathogens. This was shown to be unrelated to the weak antibiotic effect of Harmane. Using GFP-expressing E. coli EDL933, we showed that Harmane does not lower the colonization burden in the nematodes.

Author(s): 
Jakobsen, Henrik
Bojer, Martin S.
Marinus, Martin G.
Xu, Tao
Struve, Carsten
Krogfelt, Karen A.
L¯bner-Olesen, Anders
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Mutations in the clk-1 gene of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans result in slowed development, sluggish adult behaviors, and an increased lifespan. CLK-1 is a mitochondrial polypeptide with sequence and functional conservation from human to yeast. Coq7p, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue, is essential for ubiquinone (coenzyme Q or Q) synthesis and therefore respiration. However, based on assays of respiratory function, it has been reported that the primary defect in the C. elegans clk-1 mutants is not in Q biosynthesis.

Author(s): 
Jonassen, T.
Larsen, P. L.
Clarke, C. F.
Publication Title: 
BMC biology

In a paper in BMC Biology Virk et al. show that Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan is extended in response to a diet of folate-deficient Escherichia coli. The deficiencies in folate biosynthesis were due to an aroD mutation, or treatment of E. coli with sulfa drugs, which are mimics of the folate precursor para-aminobenzoic acid. This study suggests that pharmacological manipulation of the gut microbiome folate status may be a viable approach to slow animal aging, and raises questions about folate supplementation.

Author(s): 
Nguyen, Theresa P. T.
Clarke, Catherine F.
Publication Title: 
BMC microbiology

BACKGROUND: Studies with the nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans have identified conserved biochemical pathways that act to modulate life span. Life span can also be influenced by the composition of the intestinal microbiome, and C. elegans life span can be dramatically influenced by its diet of Escherichia coli. Although C. elegans is typically fed the standard OP50 strain of E. coli, nematodes fed E. coli strains rendered respiratory deficient, either due to a lack coenzyme Q or the absence of ATP synthase, show significant life span extension.

Author(s): 
Gomez, Fernando
Monsalve, Gabriela C.
Tse, Vincent
Saiki, Ryoichi
Weng, Emily
Lee, Laura
Srinivasan, Chandra
Frand, Alison R.
Clarke, Catherine F.

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