Estrogen Receptor beta

Publication Title: 
Carcinogenesis

MCF7 cells are an estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cell line that expresses both estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ERbeta. Treatment of MCF7 cells with artemisinin, an antimalarial phytochemical from the sweet wormwood plant, effectively blocked estrogen-stimulated cell cycle progression induced by either 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), an agonist for both ERs, or by propyl pyrazole triol (PPT), a selective ERalpha agonist. Artemisinin strongly downregulated ERalpha protein and transcripts without altering expression or activity of ERbeta.

Author(s): 
Sundar, Shyam N.
Marconett, Crystal N.
Doan, Victor B.
Willoughby, Jamin A.
Firestone, Gary L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Because the prevailing form of hormone replacement therapy is associated with the development of cancer in breast and endometrial tissues, alternatives are needed for the management of menopausal symptoms. Formulations of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) are being used to alleviate menopause-associated hot flashes but have shown mixed results in clinical trials. The strobiles of Humulus lupulusL.

Author(s): 
Overk, Cassia R.
Yao, Ping
Chadwick, Lucas R.
Nikolic, Dejan
Sun, Yongkai
Cuendet, Muriel A.
Deng, Yunfan
Hedayat, A. S.
Pauli, Guido F.
Farnsworth, Norman R.
van Breemen, Richard B.
Bolton, Judy L.
Publication Title: 
Anticancer Research

The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is an 18-kDa high affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding protein that is involved in various cell functions, including cell proliferation and apoptosis. PBR was shown to be overexpressed in certain types of malignant human tumors and cancer cell lines, correlating with enhanced tumorigenicity and cell proliferation rates. The present study was conducted in order to further define the role of PBR in cancer and to extend our recent findings regarding the possible anticancer effects of the standardized Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761.

Author(s): 
Pretner, Ewald
Amri, Hakima
Li, Wenping
Brown, Rachel
Lin, Chin-Shoou
Makariou, Erini
Defeudis, Francis V.
Drieu, Katy
Papadopoulos, Vassilios
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: To document the chemical and biologic profile of a clinical phase II red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) extract by identifying and measuring the major and minor components visible in the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) chromatogram and evaluating each compound for estrogenic and antioxidant activity.

Author(s): 
Booth, Nancy L.
Overk, Cassia R.
Yao, Ping
Burdette, Joanna E.
Nikolic, Dejan
Chen, Shao-Nong
Bolton, Judy L.
van Breemen, Richard B.
Pauli, Guido F.
Farnsworth, Norman R.
Publication Title: 
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology

After the Women's Health Initiative found that the risks of hormone therapy outweighed the benefits, a need for alternative drugs to treat menopausal symptoms has emerged. We explored the possibility that botanical agents used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for menopausal symptoms contain ERbeta-selective estrogens. We previously reported that an extract containing 22 herbs, MF101 has ERbeta-selective properties. In this study we isolated liquiritigenin, the most active estrogenic compound from the root of Glycyrrhizae uralensis Fisch, which is one of the plants found in MF101.

Author(s): 
Mersereau, Jennifer E.
Levy, Nitzan
Staub, Richard E.
Baggett, Scott
Zogovic, Tatjana
Zogric, Tetjana
Chow, Sylvia
Ricke, William A.
Tagliaferri, Mary
Cohen, Isaac
Bjeldanes, Leonard F.
Leitman, Dale C.
Publication Title: 
Combinatorial Chemistry & High Throughput Screening

A high throughput screening assay for the identification of ligands to pharmacologically significant receptors was developed based on magnetic particles containing immobilized receptors followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). This assay is suitable for the screening of complex mixtures such as botanical extracts. For proof-of-principle, estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) and ER-beta were immobilized on magnetic particles functionalized with aldehyde or carboxylic acid groups.

Author(s): 
Choi, Yongsoo
van Breemen, Richard B.
Publication Title: 
Combinatorial Chemistry & High Throughput Screening

Symptoms associated with menopause can greatly affect the quality of life for women. Botanical dietary supplements have been viewed by the public as safe and effective despite a lack of evidence indicating a urgent necessity to standardize these supplements chemically and biologically.

Author(s): 
Overk, Cassia R.
Yao, Ping
Chen, Shaonong
Deng, Shixing
Imai, Ayano
Main, Matthew
Schinkovitz, Andreas
Farnsworth, Norman R.
Pauli, Guido F.
Bolton, Judy L.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism

Estrogen (E2) is reported to regulate skeletal muscle mass and contractile function; whether E2 exerts its effects through estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) or -beta (ERbeta) is unclear. We determined the effect of ERalpha or ERbeta elimination on muscle mass and contractile function in multiple muscles of the lower limb, muscles with different locomotor tasks and proportions of fiber types I and II: soleus (Sol), plantaris (Plan), tibialis anterior (TA), and gastrocnemius (Gast) in mature female mice.

Author(s): 
Brown, Marybeth
Ning, Jie
Ferreira, J. Andries
Bogener, Jennifer L.
Lubahn, Dennis B.
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Outcomes from the Women's Health Initiative have demonstrated adverse effects associated with hormone therapy and have prioritized the need to develop new alternative treatments for the management of menopause and osteoporosis. To this end, we have been investigating natural herbal medicines used by Costa Rican women to manage menopausal symptoms. METHODS: Seventeen plant species were collected and extracted in Costa Rica.

Author(s): 
Doyle, Brian J.
Frasor, Jonna
Bellows, Lauren E.
Locklear, Tracie D.
Perez, Alice
Gomez-Laurito, Jorge
Mahady, Gail B.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Estrogens produce biological effects by interacting with two estrogen receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta. Drugs that selectively target ERalpha or ERbeta might be safer for conditions that have been traditionally treated with non-selective estrogens. Several synthetic and natural ERbeta-selective compounds have been identified. One class of ERbeta-selective agonists is represented by ERB-041 (WAY-202041) which binds to ERbeta much greater than ERalpha.

Author(s): 
Paruthiyil, Sreenivasan
Cvoro, Aleksandra
Zhao, Xiaoyue
Wu, Zhijin
Sui, Yunxia
Staub, Richard E.
Baggett, Scott
Herber, Candice B.
Griffin, Chandi
Tagliaferri, Mary
Harris, Heather A.
Cohen, Isaac
Bjeldanes, Leonard F.
Speed, Terence P.
Schaufele, Fred
Leitman, Dale C.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Estrogen Receptor beta