Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services

Publication Title: 
Health care ethics USA: a publication of the Center for Health Care Ethics

Ethics committees are use [sic] to questions concerning the withdrawal of life-support. Such questions become increasingly complex when that life-support is implantable, like a pacemaker. This essay seeks to address the question of under what, if any, circumstances it would be permissible to discontinue the use of such implantable devices.

Author(s): 
Slosar, John Paul
Publication Title: 
Medicinska Etika a Bioetika: Casopis Ustavu Medicinskej Etiky a Bioetiky = Medical Ethics & Bioethics: Journal of the Institute of Medical Ethics & Bioethics

Decisions on whether to resuscitate severely premature infants are especially difficult in "borderline viability" cases--those where the probability of survival is slim, and where, if survival is possible, multiple co-morbidities and severe disabilities are likely. The 2000 International Guidelines on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation are comprehensive, yet leave open some of the more difficult ethical questions that must be addressed by decision-makers.

Author(s): 
O'Brien, Dan
Publication Title: 
Health care ethics USA: a publication of the Center for Health Care Ethics

Organizations, particularly Catholic hospitals, schools and social service agencies, should re-examine their relationships to health and medical charities promoting unethical research such as human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning. Part 6 of the Ethical and Religious Directives provides a helpful framework for ethical analysis and action.

Author(s): 
Brehany, John
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

This essay reviews the Roman Catholic moral tradition surrounding treatments at the end of life together with the challenges presented to that tradition by the Texas Advance Directives Act. The impact on Catholic health care facilities and physicians, and the way in which the moral tradition should be applied under this statute, particularly with reference to the provision dealing with conflicts over end-of-life treatments, will be critically assessed.

Author(s): 
Zientek, David M.
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