Ethics, Clinical

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Palliative Nursing

AIM: To reflect on the definition of compassion and analyse the concepts encompassed by the term. BACKGROUND: A large number of authors have defined compassion, with certain nuances that differ from case to case. This raises the need for specificity in the definition of the term. DATA SOURCES: First, a systematic search was conducted of scientific databases. Second, a selection of experts were consulted and a request made to them for specific articles. Third, the snowball method was used.

Author(s): 
Perez-Bret, Encarnación
Altisent, Rogelio
Rocafort, Javier
Publication Title: 
The American journal of bioethics: AJOB

Physicians commonly recommend 'placebo treatments', which are not believed to have specific efficacy for the patient's condition. Motivations for placebo treatments include complying with patient expectations and promoting a placebo effect. In this article, we focus on two key empirical questions that must be addressed in order to assess the ethical legitimacy of placebo treatments in clinical practice: 1) do placebo treatments have the potential to produce clinically significant benefit?

Author(s): 
Miller, Franklin G.
Colloca, Luana
Publication Title: 
HEC forum: an interdisciplinary journal on hospitals' ethical and legal issues

This article critically examines, from the perspective of a Roman Catholic Healthcare ethicist, the second edition of the Core Competencies for Healthcare Ethics Consultation report recently published by the American Society for Humanities and Bioethics. The question is posed: can the competencies identified in the report serve as the core competencies for Roman Catholic ethical consultants and consultation services? I answer in the negative.

Author(s): 
Bedford, Elliott Louis
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Clinical Ethics

The author describes an alternative approach that care-providers may want to consider when caring for patients who request interventions that careproviders see as futile. This approach is based, in part, on findings of recent neuroimaging research. The author also provides several examples of seemingly justifiable "paternalistic omissions," taken from articles in this issue of The Journal of Clinical Ethics (JCE).

Author(s): 
Howe, Edmund G.
Publication Title: 
Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy

The main purpose of this paper is to clarify some senses of dignity that are particularly relevant for the treatment and care of the elderly. I make a distinction between two quite different ideas of dignity, on the one hand the basic kind of dignity possessed by every human being, and on the other hand the dignity which is the result of a person's merits, whether these be inherited or achieved.

Author(s): 
Nordenfelt, Lennart
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

The patient-doctor relationship has recently come under intense scrutiny, resulting in a re-evaluation of the basis of that relationship. The papers by Glannon and Ross, and McKay seek to identify the sources of authority in the patient-doctor relationship by evaluating it in terms of the concept of altruism. In this paper I argue that the analysis of Glannon and Ross, and of McKay is unnecessary and that the analysis offered by the latter is also flawed.

Author(s): 
McLean, S. a. M.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PURPOSE: To examine the feasibility of using the taxonomy of professional and unprofessional behaviors presented in the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM's) Project Professionalism to categorize ethical issues that undergraduate medical students perceive to be salient. METHOD: Beginning second-year medical students at the University of Washington School of Medicine (n = 120) were asked to respond to three open-ended questions about professional standards of conduct and peer evaluation.

Author(s): 
Robins, Lynne S.
Braddock, Clarence H.
Fryer-Edwards, Kelly A.
Publication Title: 
Medical Teacher

BACKGROUND: Medical professionalism is valued globally. However, Western frameworks of medical professionalism may not resonate with the cultural values of non-Western countries. AIMS: This study aims to formulate a professionalism framework for healthcare providers at Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) in China. METHODS: This study was conducted using nominal group technique (NGT) in a convenient sample of 97 participants at PUMC in November and December, 2011. Participants were sorted into 13 occupational groups, each discussing and ranking categories of medical professionalism.

Author(s): 
Pan, Hui
Norris, Jessie L.
Liang, You-Sin
Li, Jia-Ning
Ho, Ming-Jung
Publication Title: 
The Hastings Center Report
Author(s): 
Mohrmann, Margaret E.
Publication Title: 
Today's Christian Doctor: The Journal of the Christian Medical & Dental Society

Ethics consultants or committees are often called into situations of conflict. What is their role in conflict resolution? What process should they use? What standards should they apply? The methods of alternative dispute resolution (negotiation, mediation and arbitration) provide a useful model for analysis of procedure, though they may not adequately describe all ethics consultations. Boundaries of acceptable standards may be gleaned from the precepts of medical ethics as well as from statutory and case law. In addition, the believer may obtain guidance from Scripture and prayer.

Author(s): 
Orr, Robert D.

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