Ethics, Nursing

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Aging & Human Development

To understand how caregivers reason when faced with patients in late states of dementia, two recognized expert caregivers were interviewed about their experiences of caring for severely demented patients. Combined in the precontext were hermeneutic, psychodynamic, and existentialist perspectives with regard to theories of human development and care ethics.

Author(s): 
Hellner, B. M.
Norberg, A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

My original paper suggested that an ethics of care which failed to specify how, and about what, to care would be devoid of normative and descriptive content. Bradshaw's approach provides such a specification and is, therefore, not devoid of such content. However, as all ethical approaches suggest something about the 'what' and 'how' of care, they are all 'ethics of care' in this broader sense. This reinforces rather than undermines my original conclusion.

Author(s): 
Allmark, Peter
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

The subject of sexuality among elderly patients with dementia was examined, focusing on two main aspects: the sexual behaviour of institutionalized elderly people with dementia; and the reactions of other patients, staff and family members to this behaviour. The behaviour was found to be mostly heterosexual and ranged from love and caring to romance and outright eroticism. Reactions varied, being accepting of love and care but often objecting to erotic behaviour.

Author(s): 
Ehrenfeld, M.
Bronner, G.
Tabak, N.
Alpert, R.
Bergman, R.
Publication Title: 
ANS. Advances in nursing science

One invisible and silent phenomenon associated with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is the return of mothers to care for their adult sons who are dying of the disease. This article presents an emergent fit of data from an interpretative study with 14 such mothers into Leonard's practices of mothering framework. Conceptualizing mothering as a practice rather than a technical skill provides a context for understanding nurture and care.

Author(s): 
Nelms, T. P.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

It is the thesis of the authors that the caring ethic and moral state of being of nurses ideally suffuses their professional caring and is thus implicit in their ethical decision making. Socratic dialogue is a technique that allows such moral attitudes to be made explicit. This article describes a Socratic dialogue conducted with nurses on the topic: 'What is love in nursing?' The conclusions drawn were based on the belief that the current western-style health care system restricts the practice of nursing in such a way as to limit professional caring and loving possibilities.

Author(s): 
Fitzgerald, L.
van Hooft, S.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

In the West, the term 'tender, loving care' (TLC) has traditionally been used as a defining term that characterizes nursing. When this expression informs practice, it can comfort the human spirit at times of fear and vulnerability. Such notions offer meaning and resonance to the 'lived experience' of giving and receiving care. This suggests that, in a nursing context, TLC is rooted firmly in relationship, that is, the dynamic that exists between carer and cared for.

Author(s): 
Kendrick, Kevin David
Robinson, Simon
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

The aim of this study was to explore the ethical foundations for a caring The analysis is based on the ethics of Paul Ricoeur and deals with questions such as what kind of person the nurse ought to be and how she or he engages in caring conversations with suffering others. According to Ricoeur, ethics (the aim of an accomplished life) has primacy over morality (the articulation of aims in norms). At the ethical level, self-esteem and autonomy were shown to be essential for a person (nurse) to act with respect and responsibility.

Author(s): 
Fredriksson, Lennart
Eriksson, Katie
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

This article is intended to raise the question of whether sacrifice can be regarded stituting a deep ethical structure in the relationship between patient and carer. The significance of sacrifice in a patient-carer relationship cannot, however, be fully understood from the standpoint of the consistently utilitarian ethic that characterizes today's ethical discourse. Deontological ethics, with its universal principles, also does not provide a suitable point of departure.

Author(s): 
Helin, Kaija
Lindstrˆm, Unni A.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Administration Quarterly

This manuscript offers a new view of old and timeless values: the essential ethic of love, informed by contemporary European philosophies, and caring theory, as well as ancient poetry and wisdom traditions. It integrates some of the philosophical views of Levinas and Logstrup with Watson's Transpersonal Caring Theory.

Author(s): 
Watson, Jean
Publication Title: 
Nursing Philosophy: An International Journal for Healthcare Professionals

In the nursing literature, a number of qualities are associated with loving care. Reference is made to, among other things, humility, attentiveness, responsibility and duty, compassion, and tenderness. The author attempts to show that charm, in the Marcelian sense, also plays a central role. It is argued that the moral foundation of charm is a unity of agape and eros. An impartial giving of the self for others is clearly of fundamental importance in an ethic of care. Including charm in the discussion points to the fact that eros also plays a crucial role.

Author(s): 
Pembroke, Neil

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