Ethnobotany

Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Symplocos racemosa Roxb. belongs to a unigeneric family Symplocaceae, known as lodhra in Sanskrit; is a small evergreen tree, found throughout the tropical and sub-tropical countries. Ethnobotanical literature indicates use of S. racemosa in treatment of eye disease, skin diseases, ear diseases, liver and bowel complaints, tumors, uterine disorders, spongy and bleeding gums, asthma, fever, snake-bite, gonorrhea and arthritis. The main aim of this review is to provide detailed phytopharmacological profile on S.

Author(s): 
Acharya, Niyati
Acharya, Sanjeev
Shah, Unnati
Shah, Ripal
Hingorani, Lal
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

AIM OF THE STUDY: Traditional medicine of clod desert Ladakh has large potential to treat various ailments among tribal communities inhabited in the remotest region of Indian subcontinent. This study was conducted to document the new ethno-medico-botanical information and traditional use of medicinal plants against kidney and urinary disorders, and thus to conserve the rapidly disappearing traditional knowledge system of Amchis of Ladakh.

Author(s): 
Ballabh, Basant
Chaurasia, O. P.
Ahmed, Zakwan
Singh, Shashi Bala
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

AIM OF THE STUDY: The role of ethnobotany in drug discovery is huge but there are criticisms over such studies due to their qualitative nature. The present study is aimed at quantitatively abstracting the medicinal plant knowledge of the healers trained in traditional ways, in Mayiladumparai block of Theni District, Tamil Nadu, India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The interviews and field observations were carried out in all the 18 village panchayaths from January to June 2010, consisting of 148 field days.

Author(s): 
Pandikumar, P.
Chellappandian, M.
Mutheeswaran, S.
Ignacimuthu, S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: For thousands of years, medicinal plants have played an important role throughout the world in treating and preventing a variety of diseases. Kani tribal people in Tirunelveli hills still depend on medicinal plants and most of them have a general knowledge of medicinal plants which are used for first aid remedies, to treat cough, cold, fever, headache, poisonous bites and some simple ailments.

Author(s): 
Ayyanar, Muniappan
Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine

BACKGROUND: The usage of medicinal plants is traditionally rooted in Bangladesh and still an essential part of public healthcare. Recently, a dramatically increasing prevalence brought diabetes mellitus and its therapy to the focus of public health interests in Bangladesh. We conducted an ethnobotanical survey to identify the traditional medicinal plants being used to treat diabetes in Bangladesh and to critically assess their anti-diabetic potentials with focus on evidence-based criteria.

Author(s): 
Ocvirk, Soeren
Kistler, Martin
Khan, Shusmita
Talukder, Shamim Hayder
Hauner, Hans
Publication Title: 
TheScientificWorldJournal

Most investigations into the antimalarial activity of African plants are centered on finding an indigenous equivalent to artemisinin, the compound from which current frontline antimalarial drugs are synthesized. As a consequence, the standard practice in ethnopharmacological research is to use in vitro assays to identify compounds that inhibit parasites at nanomolar concentrations.

Author(s): 
Maranz, Steven
Publication Title: 
Phytotherapy research: PTR

Conjunctivitis is a major occular external infection in tropical countries. Although not a very serious disease, it gives much discomfort and sometimes leads to partial blindness or blindness due to corneal involvement. Conjunctivitis has been known to occur in epidemic proportions in different parts of the world, mainly African and Asian regions. The indigenous cure of conjunctivitis using herbal products has been popular for centuries. This paper is an attempt to compile information on plants mentioned as a cure for conjunctivitis during ethnobotanical surveys between 1933 and 2000.

Author(s): 
Sharma, Poonam
Singh, Gian
Publication Title: 
Molecular Aspects of Medicine

Plants have provided Man with all his needs in terms of shelter, clothing, food, flavours and fragrances as not the least, medicines. Plants have formed the basis of sophisticated traditional medicine systems among which are Ayurvedic, Unani, Chinese amongst others. These systems of medicine have given rise to some important drugs still in use today. Among the lesser-known systems of medicines are the African and Australian, Central and South American amongst others.

Author(s): 
Gurib-Fakim, Ameenah
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

Tribal and non-tribal inhabitants of Andhra Pradesh used nearly 80 medicinal plants for treating asthma. The tribal people have a strong faith and belief in the traditional health care system, through herbal treatment. Plant species are generally used along with other materials and plant products in different combinations to effective cure. Herbalists reported that plant ingredients are used in the form of dry powder, decoction and juice in the treatment of asthma.

Author(s): 
Savithramma, N.
Sulochana, Ch
Rao, K. N.
Publication Title: 
Fitoterapia

Cassia occidentalis L. is an annual or perennial Ayurvedic plant which is used in several traditional medicines to cure various diseases. This weed has been known to possess antibacterial, antifungal, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, anticancerous, antimutagenic and hepatoprotective activity. A wide range of chemical compounds including achrosin, aloe-emodin, emodin, anthraquinones, anthrones, apigenin, aurantiobtusin, campesterol, cassiollin, chryso-obtusin, chrysophanic acid, chrysarobin, chrysophanol, chrysoeriol etc. have been isolated from this plant.

Author(s): 
Yadav, J. P.
Arya, Vedpriya
Yadav, Sanjay
Panghal, Manju
Kumar, Sandeep
Dhankhar, Seema

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