Evaluation Studies as Topic

Publication Title: 
Physical Therapy

The purposes of this study were 1) to examine the effect of high intensity, low frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation at auricular acupuncture points on experimental pain threshold measured at the wrist and 2) to determine the changes in effect over time. Forty-four healthy adult men and women were assigned randomly to one of three treatment groups. Group 1 (n = 15) received TENS to appropriate auricular points for wrist pain, Group 2 (n = 14) received TENS to inappropriate (placebo) auricular points, and Group 3 (n = 15) received no TENS.

Author(s): 
Noling, L. B.
Clelland, J. A.
Jackson, J. R.
Knowles, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Physical Therapy

The purpose of this study was to replicate a previous study to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in treating primary dysmenorrhea. Twenty-one women with dysmenorrhea received a placebo pill or 30 minutes of acupuncture-like TENS. All subjects completed two pain questionnaires before treatment; immediately posttreatment; 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes posttreatment; and the next morning upon awakening.

Author(s): 
Lewers, D.
Clelland, J. A.
Jackson, J. R.
Varner, R. E.
Bergman, J.
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)

This paper examines some of the problems specifically associated with conducting research into acupuncture and how this can lead to further problems with subsequent systematic reviews. Studies for the treatment of chronic neck pain have been used as examples of how presented information can be misleading to an acupuncture-naive reader and how researchers must be sensitive to these problems when compiling their inclusion and exclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
White, P.
Lewith, G.
Berman, B.
Birch, S.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Out-of-pocket expenditures of over 34 billion dollars per year in the US are an apparent testament to a widely held belief that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies have benefits that outweigh their costs. However, regardless of public opinion, there is often little more than anecdotal evidence on the health and economic implications of CAM therapies. The objectives of this study are to present an overview of economic evaluation and to expand upon a previous review to examine the current scope and quality of CAM economic evaluations.

Author(s): 
Herman, Patricia M.
Craig, Benjamin M.
Caspi, Opher
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Veterinary Medical Science / the Japanese Society of Veterinary Science

This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on induced chronic arthritis of the dog by thermography. Complete Freund's adjuvant was injected into the left knee joint of 8 dogs to induce arthritis. Acupuncture was applied to BL-40, GB-33, GB-34, and LIV-8 once a week for 4 consecutive weeks, from 3 weeks after induction of chronic arthritis, in treatment group. At 3 weeks of acupuncture treatment, skin temperature difference (DeltaT) of treatment group returned to normal range (< 0.3 degrees C), while DeltaT remained high in non-treatment group.

Author(s): 
Um, Se-Wook
Kim, Min-Su
Lim, Ji-Hey
Kim, Sun-Young
Seo, Kang-Moon
Nam, Tchi-Chou
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a prominent clinical problem. There are calls for multi-modal interventions. METHODS: We assessed the feasibility of delivering patient education integrated with acupuncture for relief of CRF in a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with breast cancer survivors using usual care as control. Social cognitive and integrative medicine theories guided integration of patient education with acupuncture into a coherent treatment protocol. The intervention consisted of two parts.

Author(s): 
Johnston, Michael F.
Hays, Ron D.
Subramanian, Saskia K.
Elashoff, Robert M.
Axe, Eleanor K.
Li, Jie-Jia
Kim, Irene
Vargas, Roberto B.
Lee, Jihey
Yang, LuGe
Hui, Ka-Kit
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is still a worldwide health risk. Current pharmacotherapies have at best, a success rate of no more than 50%. Auricular (ear) acupressure has been purported to be beneficial in achieving smoking cessation in some studies, while in others has been deemed insignificant. We hereby describe the protocol for a three-arm randomised controlled trial to examine the possible benefits of self-administered acupressure for smoking cessation.

Author(s): 
Leung, Lawrence
Neufeld, Troy
Marin, Scott
Publication Title: 
Lancet

The analgesic effect of acupuncture was evaluated by a double-blind controlled trial in 90 patients undergoing gastroscopy. The endoscopy was much easier and better tolerated after real acupuncture had been performed.

Author(s): 
Cahn, A. M.
Carayon, P.
Hill, C.
Flamant, R.

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