Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory

Publication Title: 
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Author(s): 
Barabasz, A. F.
Lonsdale, C.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

Effects of hypnotic alterations of perception on amplitude of somatosensory event-related potentials were studied in 10 highly hypnotizable subjects and 10 subjects with low hypnotizability. The highly hypnotizable individuals showed significant decreases in amplitude of the P100 and P300 waveform components during a hypnotic hallucination that blocked perception of the stimulus. When hypnosis was used to intensify attention to the stimulus, there was an increase in P100 amplitude.

Author(s): 
Spiegel, D.
Bierre, P.
Rootenberg, J.
Publication Title: 
Pain

Pain ratings and pain-related cerebral potentials in response to noxious stimuli were investigated under hypnotic hypo- or hyperalgesia. Out of a sample of 50 subjects the 10 most highly hypnotizable were selected using the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale. Phasic pain was induced by brief electrical stimuli intracutaneously applied to the subject's left middle finger. The subjects took part in three experimental sessions. The first session was without hypnosis for familiarization with the experimental surroundings.

Author(s): 
Meier, W.
Klucken, M.
Soyka, D.
Bromm, B.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Pain reports and amplitudes of painful argon laser-induced brain potentials were obtained for 10 high and 10 low hypnotizable volunteers following placebo and a randomized sequence of four hypnotically induced conditions of (a) neutral hypnosis, (b) deep relaxation, (c) pleasant dissociated "out of body" imagery, and (d) focused analgesia of the hand. Both high and low hypnotizable subjects exhibited significant reductions of reported pain during conditions of neutral hypnosis, relaxation, dissociated imagery, and focused analgesia.

Author(s): 
Zachariae, R.
Bjerring, P.
Publication Title: 
Pain

In this study, pain perception, somatosensory event-related potential (SERP) and skin conductance response (SCR) changes during hypnotic suggestions of Deep Relaxation, Dissociated Imagery, Focused Analgesia, and Placebo, compared with a Waking baseline condition, were investigated. SERPs were recorded from frontal, temporal, central, and parietal scalp sites. Ten high, 9 mid, and 10 low hypnotizable right-handed women participated in the experiment.

Author(s): 
De Pascalis, V.
Magurano, M. R.
Bellusci, A.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology

OBJECTIVES: The issues of differential effects among cognitive strategies during hypnosis in the control of human pain are under active debate. This study, which employs measures of pain perception, electrocortical and autonomic responses, was aimed at determining these pain-related modulations.

Author(s): 
De Pascalis, V.
Magurano, M. R.
Bellusci, A.
Chen, A. C.
Publication Title: 
Pain

Somatosensory event-related phase-ordered gamma oscillations (40-Hz) to electric painful standard stimuli under an odd-ball paradigm were analyzed in 13 high, 13 medium, and 12 low hypnotizable subjects during waking, hypnosis, and post-hypnosis conditions. During these conditions, subjects received a suggestion of Focused Analgesia to produce an obstructive hallucination of stimulus perception; a No-Analgesia treatment served as a control. After hypnosis, a post-hypnotic suggestion was given to draw waking subjects into a deep hypnosis with opened eyes.

Author(s): 
De Pascalis, Vilfredo
Cacace, Immacolata
Massicolle, Francesca
Publication Title: 
Anesthesia and Analgesia

In this study we compared the effects of propofol, small-dose isoflurane, and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) on cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and bispectral index (BIS) monitoring in adolescents undergoing spinal fusion. Twelve patients received the following anesthetic maintenance combinations in a randomly determined order: treatment #1: isoflurane 0.4% + N(2)O 70% + O(2) 30%; treatment #2: isoflurane 0.6% + N(2)O 70% + O(2) 30%; treatment #3: isoflurane 0.6% + air + O(2) 30%; treatment #4: propofol 120 microg . kg(-1) . min(-1) + air + O(2) 30%.

Author(s): 
Clapcich, Anthony J.
Emerson, Ronald G.
Roye, David P.
Xie, Hui
Gallo, Edward J.
Dowling, Kathy C.
Ramnath, Brian
Heyer, Eric J.
Publication Title: 
Masui. The Japanese Journal of Anesthesiology

BACKGROUND: The effect of anesthetics on somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and auditory brain stem response (ABR) has been a subject of intense reseach over the last two decades. In fact, volatile anesthetics have been repeatedly shown to decrease cortical amplitude in a dose-dependent fashion but the information regarding the effect of propofol is incomplete. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of sevoflurane and propofol on evoked potentials during comparable depth of anesthesia guided by bispectral index (BIS).

Author(s): 
Nakagawa, Itsuo
Hidaka, Syozo
Okada, Hironori
Kubo, Takashi
Okamura, Kenta
Kato, Takahiro
Publication Title: 
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics

BACKGROUND: Depersonalization (DP) is characterized by persistent or recurrent episodes of detachment from one's self with reduced pain perception being a common feature. Alterations in the body schema similar to the cortico-limbic disconnection syndrome of pain asymbolia are suggested to be responsible for DP. In this study we used hypnosis to induce DP in healthy subjects and to examine neural patterns of pain perception in the state of DP by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Author(s): 
Röder, Christian H.
Michal, Matthias
Overbeck, G.
van de Ven, Vincent G.
Linden, David E. J.

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