Exercise Movement Techniques

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is defined as pain lasting beyond normal tissue healing time, generally taken to be 12 weeks. It contributes to disability, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and healthcare costs. Chronic pain has a weighted mean prevalence in adults of 20%.For many years, the treatment choice for chronic pain included recommendations for rest and inactivity.

Author(s): 
Geneen, Louise J.
Moore, R. Andrew
Clarke, Clare
Martin, Denis
Colvin, Lesley A.
Smith, Blair H.
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry Research

This systematic review summarizes the most recent evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) considering the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions (aerobic exercises, strength exercises, relaxation training, basic body awareness exercises, or a combination of these) within the multidisciplinary management of schizophrenia. Two authors searched PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Web of Science, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and the Cochrane Library considering RCTs published from July 1, 2011-October 1, 2014.

Author(s): 
Vera-Garcia, Elisa
Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín
Vancampfort, Davy
Stubbs, Brendon
Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Mind-body interventions are based on the holistic principle that mind, body and behaviour are all interconnected. Mind-body interventions incorporate strategies that are thought to improve psychological and physical well-being, aim to allow patients to take an active role in their treatment, and promote people's ability to cope. Mind-body interventions are widely used by people with fibromyalgia to help manage their symptoms and improve well-being.

Author(s): 
Theadom, Alice
Cropley, Mark
Smith, Helen E.
Feigin, Valery L.
McPherson, Kathryn
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Non-invasive physical treatments are often used to treat common types of chronic/recurrent headache. OBJECTIVES: To quantify and compare the magnitude of short- and long-term effects of non-invasive physical treatments for chronic/recurrent headaches. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the following databases from their inception to November 2002: MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, CINAHL, Science Citation Index, Dissertation Abstracts, CENTRAL, and the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Pain, Palliative Care and Supportive Care review group.

Author(s): 
Bronfort, G.
Nilsson, N.
Haas, M.
Evans, R.
Goldsmith, C. H.
Assendelft, W. J. J.
Bouter, L. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

Biomedical research has led to the hypothesis that inflammation is the culprit behind almost every modern chronic illness. Hence there is interest in techniques that can resolve acute and chronic inflammation. A natural method involves connecting the human body to the earth (earthing). When done during sleep, earthing normalizes the daily cortisol rhythm, improves sleep and reduces pain and inflammation. Direct electrical connection with the earth enables diurnal (daily) electrical rhythms and electrons to flow from the earth to the body.

Author(s): 
Oschman, James L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of American college health: J of ACH

OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether mindfulness increased through participation in movement-based courses and whether changes in self-regulatory self-efficacy, mood, and perceived stress mediated the relationship between increased mindfulness and better sleep. PARTICIPANTS: 166 college students enrolled in the 2007-2008 academic year in 15 week classes in Pilates, Taiji quan, or GYROKINESIS. METHODS: At beginning, middle, and end of the semester, participants completed measures of mindfulness, self-regulatory self-efficacy, mood, perceived stress, and sleep quality.

Author(s): 
Caldwell, Karen
Harrison, Mandy
Adams, Marianne
Quin, Rebecca H.
Greeson, Jeffrey
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Medical Research

OBJECTIVE: To compare anthroposophic treatment (eurythmy, rhythmical massage or art therapy; counselling, anthroposophic medication) and conventional treatment for low back pain (LBP) under routine conditions. METHODS: 62 consecutive outpatients from 38 medical practices in Germany, consulting an anthroposophic (A-) or conventional (C-) physician with LBP of >or= 6 weeks duration participated in a prospective non-randomised comparative study.

Author(s): 
Hamre, H. J.
Witt, C. M.
Glockmann, A.
Wegscheider, K.
Ziegler, R.
Willich, S. N.
Kiene, H.

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