Extraversion (Psychology)

Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

The present study examined individual differences in change in extraversion, neuroticism, and work and relationship satisfaction. Of particular interest were the correlations between changes. Data were from the Victorian Quality of Life Panel Study (B. Headey & A. Wearing, 1989, 1992), in which an overall 1,130 individuals participated (ages 16 to 70). Respondents were assessed every 2 years from 1981 to 1989. Four major findings emerged. (a) There were significant individual differences in changes in extraversion and neuroticism. (b) Change was not limited to young adulthood.

Author(s): 
Scollon, Christie Napa
Diener, Ed
Publication Title: 
Tijdschrift Voor Gerontologie En Geriatrie

The instability of personality characteristics and personality disorders during the lifespan is the topic of this literature search. It concerns the effects of this instability for personality assessment in older adults. Five longitudinal studies, based on the Big Five model of Costa & McCrae, support the hypothesis that personality characteristics change during the lifespan. Neuroticism, extraversion and openness decrease with age. In contrast, altruism and conscientiousness increase with age.

Author(s): 
Tummers, J. H. A.
Derksen, J. L. L.
van Alphen, S. P. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality

The study examines the extent to which 2 sets of personality variables-(1) dispositional traits (and their facets) within the Big Five taxonomy and (2) the adult developmental construct of generativity-are associated with psychosocial adaptation in midlife adults (N=128), conceived as the combination of individual well-being and positive societal involvements. Generativity is conceived as an adult's concern for and commitment to promoting the well-being of future generations.

Author(s): 
Cox, Keith S.
Wilt, Joshua
Olson, Brad
McAdams, Dan P.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The ability to empathize with other people is a critical component of human social relationships. Empathic processing varies across the human population, however it is currently unclear how personality traits are associated with empathic processing. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that specific personality traits are associated with behavioral and biological indicators of improved empathy.

Author(s): 
Haas, Brian W.
Brook, Michael
Remillard, Laura
Ishak, Alexandra
Anderson, Ian W.
Filkowski, Megan M.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Psychiatry: The Journal of Mental Science
Author(s): 
Marks, I. M.
Gelder, M. G.
Edwards, G.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Psychology (London, England: 1953)

Following the study of Gibson & Curran (1974), a further sample of 45 subjects were tested on the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) and a slightly modified form of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale (SHSS) in precisely the same way. The results in this second sample were broadly the same as those obtained in the earlier study. Combining the two samples, it was found that the sex variable provided some interesting contrasts. The power of the lie scale of the EPI to predict hypnotic susceptibility observed earlier was found to be a significant effect only for males.

Author(s): 
Gibson, H. B.
Corcoran, M. E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

State manifestations of the trait of absorption--a trait associated with differential responsivity to hypnosis, meditation, marijuana intoxification, and electromyograph (EMG) biofeedback--were assessed to determine (a) if absorption correlates with various (sub)dimensions of phenomenological experience, and (b) if individuals of differing absorption ability experience different states of consciousness. In two experiments 249 and 304 participants completed Tellegen's absorption scale and experienced several stimulus conditions.

Author(s): 
Pekala, R. J.
Wenger, C. F.
Levine, R. L.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether placebo responses can be explained by characteristics of the patient, the practitioner, or their interpersonal interaction. METHODS: We performed an analysis of videotape and psychometric data from a clinical trial of patients with irritable bowel syndrome who were treated with placebo acupuncture in either a warm empathic interaction (Augmented, n = 96), a neutral interaction (Limited, n = 97), or a waitlist control (Waitlist, n = 96).

Author(s): 
Kelley, John M.
Lembo, Anthony J.
Ablon, J. Stuart
Villanueva, Joel J.
Conboy, Lisa A.
Levy, Ray
Marci, Carl D.
Kerr, Catherine E.
Kirsch, Irving
Jacobson, Eric E.
Riess, Helen
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that neuroticism moderates the association between APOE (apolipoprotein E) genotype and two major outcomes, cognitive function and Alzheimer disease. We also explored whether other personality dimensions (extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) moderate the associations of APOE with these outcomes. DESIGN: Primary analyses of existing randomized clinical trial data. SAMPLE: Six-hundred two older adults (mean age of 78 years at baseline).

Author(s): 
Dar-Nimrod, Ilan
Chapman, Benjamin P.
Franks, Peter
Robbins, John
Porsteinsson, Anton
Mapstone, Mark
Duberstein, Paul R.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether placebo responses can be explained by characteristics of the patient, the practitioner, or their interpersonal interaction. METHODS: We performed an analysis of videotape and psychometric data from a clinical trial of patients with irritable bowel syndrome who were treated with placebo acupuncture in either a warm empathic interaction (Augmented, n = 96), a neutral interaction (Limited, n = 97), or a waitlist control (Waitlist, n = 96).

Author(s): 
Kelley, John M.
Lembo, Anthony J.
Ablon, J. Stuart
Villanueva, Joel J.
Conboy, Lisa A.
Levy, Ray
Marci, Carl D.
Kerr, Catherine E.
Kirsch, Irving
Jacobson, Eric E.
Riess, Helen
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
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