Faculty, Medical

Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. METHOD: Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Chaterji, Ranjana
Tractenberg, Rochelle E.
Amri, Hakima
Lumpkin, Michael
Amorosi, Sharon B. W.
Haramati, Aviad
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice

Changes in the healthcare environment are putting increasing pressure on medical schools to make faculty accountable and to document the quality of the medical education they provide. Faculty's ratings of students' performances and students' ratings of faculty's teaching are important elements in these efforts to document educational quality.

Author(s): 
Albanese, M. A.
Publication Title: 
Rural and Remote Health

INTRODUCTION: The Rural Undergraduate Support and Coordination program funds medical schools to provide all medical students some time in rural Australia throughout their course. The University of Adelaide has developed a rural week program for both first and second year students to fulfill part of this objective. METHODS: First year students' rural week is an introduction to a range of rural health issues, Indigenous culture and rural lifestyle issues.

Author(s): 
Newbury, Jonathan W.
Shannon, Susan
Ryan, Vanessa
Whitrow, Melissa
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Leadership in improving the education of doctors, while impressive, is not happening fast enough. While there are many obstacles, there is no time to waste in restructuring medical education to repair its present deficiencies, for otherwise outside forces could overwhelm today's education leaders with imperatives to make improvements on their own terms. The first step in addressing present shortcomings is to establish measurable objectives for the education of doctors that are aligned with the legitimate expectations of society and the enduring precepts of the medical profession.

Author(s): 
Cohen, J. J.
Publication Title: 
Teaching and Learning in Medicine

PURPOSE: To provide a working definition of professionalism for medical educators. SUMMARY: Thus far, the literature has not provided a concise and inclusive definition of the word profession. There appears to be a need for one as a basis for teaching the cognitive aspects of the subject and for evaluating behaviors characteristic of professionals. Furthermore, a knowledge of the meaning of the word is important as it serves as the basis of the contract between medicine and society, and hence, of the obligations required of medicine to sustain the contract.

Author(s): 
Cruess, Sylvia R.
Johnston, Sharon
Cruess, Richard L.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PROBLEM STATEMENT AND BACKGROUND: The evaluation of professionalism often relies on the observation and interpretation of students' behaviors; however, little research is available regarding faculty's interpretations of these behaviors. METHOD: Interviews were conducted with 30 faculty, who were asked to respond to five videotaped scenarios in which students are placed in professionally challenging situations. Behaviors were catalogued by person and by scenario. RESULTS: There was little agreement between faculty about what students should and should not do in each scenario.

Author(s): 
Ginsburg, Shiphra
Regehr, Glenn
Lingard, Lorelei
Publication Title: 
BMC medical education

BACKGROUND: This study was designed to assess the motivations of senior medical clinicians to teach medical students. This understanding could improve the recruitment and retention of important clinical teachers. METHODS: The study group was 101 senior medical clinicians registered on a teaching list for a medical school teaching hospital (The Canberra Hospital, ACT, Australia). Their motivations to teach medical students were assessed applying Q methodology. RESULTS: Of the 75 participants, 18 (24%) were female and 57 (76%) were male.

Author(s): 
Dahlstrom, Jane
Dorai-Raj, Anna
McGill, Darryl
Owen, Cathy
Tymms, Kathleen
Watson, D. Ashley R.

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