Family Health

Publication Title: 
Neurotherapeutics: The Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics

This review focuses on helping clinicians identify resources and develop strategies they may use to effectively negotiate safe and effective use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments with families of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), as well as other neurodevelopmental disorders.

Author(s): 
Akins, R. Scott
Angkustsiri, Kathy
Hansen, Robin L.
Publication Title: 
Nurse Researcher

AIM: To highlight from a doctoral student's perspective some of the unexpected and challenging issues that may arise when collecting data in a complex, qualitative study. BACKGROUND: Using a qualitative approach to undertaking a PhD requires commitment to the research topic, the acquisition of a variety of research skills and the development of expertise in writing. Despite close research supervision and guidance, the first author of this paper experienced unexpected hurdles when collecting data.

Author(s): 
Dowse, Eileen Mary
van der Riet, Pamela
Keatinge, Diana Rosemary
Publication Title: 
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing

Caring for patients with various conditions is demanding and stressful and can have a negative impact on both physical and psychological health. This paper reports a systematic review and critical appraisal of the evidence on the effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction for the family caregivers of patients with various conditions. There were improvements in the self-rated psychological symptoms, such as stress, depression, anxiety and mindfulness.

Author(s): 
Li, Guichen
Yuan, Hua
Zhang, Wei
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Rather than being a passive, haphazard process of wear and tear, lifespan can be modulated actively by components of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor I (IGFI) pathway in laboratory animals. Complete or partial loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding components of the insulin/IGFI pathway result in extension of life span in yeasts, worms, flies, and mice. This remarkable conservation throughout evolution suggests that altered signaling in this pathway may also influence human lifespan.

Author(s): 
Suh, Yousin
Atzmon, Gil
Cho, Mi-Ook
Hwang, David
Liu, Bingrong
Leahy, Daniel J.
Barzilai, Nir
Cohen, Pinchas
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Centenarians exist at the extreme of life expectancy and are rare. A number of pedigree and molecular genetic studies indicate that a significant component of exceptional longevity is genetically influenced. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a genetic locus on chromosome 4 indicates the powerful potential of studying centenarians for genetic factors that significantly modulate aging and susceptibility to age-related diseases. These studies include siblings and children of centenarians.

Author(s): 
Perls, Thomas
Terry, Dellara
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To explore measures of metabolic syndrome and glucose metabolism in families with exceptional longevity. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: A university hospital in Leiden, the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred twenty-one offspring of nonagenarian siblings, who were enriched for familial factors promoting longevity, and 113 of their partners. No subject had diabetes mellitus. MEASUREMENTS: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program.

Author(s): 
Rozing, Maarten P.
Westendorp, Rudi G. J.
de Craen, Anton J. M.
Frˆlich, Marijke
de Goeij, Moniek C. M.
Heijmans, Bastiaan T.
Beekman, Marian
Wijsman, Carolien A.
Mooijaart, Simon P.
Blauw, Gerard-Jan
Slagboom, P. Eline
van Heemst, Diana
Leiden Longevity Study Group
Publication Title: 
Neurobiology of Aging

The authors investigated whether cognitive function may be used as an endophenotype for longevity by assessing the cognitive performance of a family-based cohort consisting of 1380 individuals from 283 families recruited for exceptional survival in field centers in Boston, New York, Pittsburgh, and Denmark. Cognitive performance was assessed in the combined offspring of the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) probands and their LLFS siblings as compared with their spouses' cognitive performance.

Author(s): 
Barral, Sandra
Cosentino, Stephanie
Costa, Rosann
Matteini, Amy
Christensen, Kaare
Andersen, Stacy L.
Glynn, Nancy W.
Newman, Anne B.
Mayeux, Richard
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To test whether lower serum uric acid (UA) levels are associated with longevity independent of renal function. DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study. SETTING: Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with exceptional longevity (Longevity Genes Project at Albert Einstein College of Medicine). PARTICIPANTS: Long-lived individuals (LLI) of Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity (mean age ± standard deviation 97.7 ± 2.9, n = 365), their offspring (mean age ± standard deviation 68.2 ± 8.2, n = 593) and controls (without family history of longevity, mean age ± standard deviation 72.5 ± 9.9, n = 356).

Author(s): 
Lai, Jennifer Yi-Chun
Atzmon, Gil
Melamed, Michal L.
Hostetter, Thomas H.
Crandall, Jill P.
Barzilai, Nir
Bitzer, Markus
Publication Title: 
Neurobiology of Aging

Research to understand variability at the highest end of the cognitive performance distribution has been scarce. Our aim was to define a cognitive endophenotype based on exceptional episodic memory (EM) performance and to investigate familial aggregation of EM in families from the Long Life Family Study (LLFS). Using a sample of 1911 nondemented offspring of long-lived probands, we created a quantitative phenotype, EM (memory z ? 1.5), and classified LLFS families as EM and non-EM families based on the number of EM offspring.

Author(s): 
Barral, Sandra
Cosentino, Stephanie
Costa, Rosann
Andersen, Stacey L.
Christensen, Kaare
Eckfeldt, John H.
Newman, Anne B.
Perls, Thomas T.
Province, Michael A.
Hadley, Evan C.
Rossi, Winifred K.
Mayeux, Richard
Long Life Family Study
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To test whether lower serum uric acid (UA) levels are associated with longevity independent of renal function. DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study. SETTING: Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with exceptional longevity (Longevity Genes Project at Albert Einstein College of Medicine). PARTICIPANTS: Long-lived individuals (LLI) of Ashkenazi Jewish ethnicity (mean age ± standard deviation 97.7 ± 2.9, n = 365), their offspring (mean age ± standard deviation 68.2 ± 8.2, n = 593) and controls (without family history of longevity, mean age ± standard deviation 72.5 ± 9.9, n = 356).

Author(s): 
Lai, Jennifer Yi-Chun
Atzmon, Gil
Melamed, Michal L.
Hostetter, Thomas H.
Crandall, Jill P.
Barzilai, Nir
Bitzer, Markus

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