Family Practice

Publication Title: 
Annals of Family Medicine

BACKGROUND: We undertook a literature review to produce evidence-based recommendations for nonsurgical family physician management of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). METHODS: Study design was systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on CTS treatment. Data sources were English publications from all relevant databases, hand searches, and guidelines. Outcomes measured were nonsurgical management options for CTS. RESULTS: We assessed 2 systematic reviews, 16 RCTs, and 1 before-and-after study using historical controls. A considerable percentage of CTS resolves spontaneously.

Author(s): 
Goodyear-Smith, Felicity
Arroll, Bruce
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

Significant evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of several complementary or integrative treatment approaches to common primary care problems. Acupuncture is effective in the management of chronic low back pain. Mind-body interventions such as cognitive behavior therapy, yoga, tai chi, qi gong, and music therapy may be helpful for treating insomnia. Exercise can reduce anxiety symptoms. Herbal preparations and nutritional supplements can be useful as first-line therapy for certain conditions, such as fish oil for hypertriglyceridemia, St.

Author(s): 
Kligler, Benjamin
Teets, Raymond
Quick, Melissa
Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician

BACKGROUND: While many general practitioners perceive meditation as an acceptable, even mainstream, health care strategy, it is paradoxically a poorly understood discipline. OBJECTIVE: To define meditation, outline the broad types of meditation and give an overview of the extent and validity of available evidence for its efficacy. DISCUSSION: The basic question of what constitutes meditation and what separates it from relaxation therapy has been an impediment to formulating quality studies in order to research meditation techniques.

Author(s): 
Manocha, R.
Publication Title: 
Australian Family Physician

BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common presentation in general practice. Nevertheless, recommendations for the investigation and management of neck pain lack a strong evidence base and are predominantly extrapolated from low back pain studies. OBJECTIVE: This review provides an investigation and treatment paradigm to help primary care physicians assess and manage cervical spine pain. DISCUSSION: Although sinister causes of neck pain are rare, clinicians must be mindful of red flags that may indicate serious pathology.

Author(s): 
Teichtahl, Andrew J.
McColl, Geoffrey
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Sexual problems are common but infrequently diagnosed. They are classified into four major categories: (1) sexual desire disorders, (2) sexual arousal disorders, (3) orgasmic disorders, and (4) sexual pain disorders. METHODS: MEDLINE files from 1966 to the present were searched using the specific sexual dysfunctions as key words along with the general key word "sexual dysfunction" to review the published literature. Additional articles came from the reference lists of dysfunction-specific reviews.

Author(s): 
Halvorsen, J. G.
Metz, M. E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

The integration of complementary therapies within the British National Health Service (NHS) in the context of limited evidence of effectiveness has been much debated, as has the need for the provision of health services to be more evidence-based. In June 1994, a project was launched within a South-East London NHS Hospital Trust to introduce complementary therapy (acupuncture, homeopathy, and osteopathy), in the context of an evaluation program.

Author(s): 
Richardson, J.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

This comparative quantitative study explored General Practitioners' (GPs) attitudes to homeopathy in Dumfries and Galloway, a predominantly rural area in South West Scotland where there is a local British Homeopathic Association Funded Homeopathic Clinic. It aimed to determine whether there was an association between expressed attitudes to homeopathy and a number of variables. Issues arising from the House of Lords Report on CAM were also explored. A self-administered questionnaire was addressed to all 135 GPs within Dumfries and Galloway.

Author(s): 
Hamilton, E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to chart the experiences of homeopathic injectables prescribing practitioners with regard to safety issues and the extent in which these practitioners would feel restricted in case subcutaneously administered homeopathics were banned. DESIGN: This was a survey among practitioners who prescribe homeopathic injectables in 12 European countries. SUBJECTS: Data were gathered from 1693 doctors experienced in the use of homeopathic injectables for subcutaneous use. The data are based on experience with an estimated 36 million patient contacts.

Author(s): 
Baars, Erik W.
Adriaansen-Tennekes, Ruth
Eikmans, Karin J. L.
Publication Title: 
American Family Physician

Significant evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of several complementary or integrative treatment approaches to common primary care problems. Acupuncture is effective in the management of chronic low back pain. Mind-body interventions such as cognitive behavior therapy, yoga, tai chi, qi gong, and music therapy may be helpful for treating insomnia. Exercise can reduce anxiety symptoms. Herbal preparations and nutritional supplements can be useful as first-line therapy for certain conditions, such as fish oil for hypertriglyceridemia, St.

Author(s): 
Kligler, Benjamin
Teets, Raymond
Quick, Melissa
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

The integration of complementary therapies within the British National Health Service (NHS) in the context of limited evidence of effectiveness has been much debated, as has the need for the provision of health services to be more evidence-based. In June 1994, a project was launched within a South-East London NHS Hospital Trust to introduce complementary therapy (acupuncture, homeopathy, and osteopathy), in the context of an evaluation program.

Author(s): 
Richardson, J.

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