Fantasy

Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

We conducted an initial screening session in which hypnosis was presented as a "test of imagination" and administered with other imagination measures. In a second session, we instructed high- and low-hypnotizable subjects to imagine along with suggestions but to resist responding to motoric suggestions. Subjects received either instructions to use goal-directed fantasies (GDFs) or no facilitative instructions. Sizable individual difference effects were secured.

Author(s): 
Lynn, S. J.
Snodgrass, M.
Rhue, J. W.
Hardaway, R.
Publication Title: 
The American Psychologist
Author(s): 
Lynn, S. J.
Rhue, J. W.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

The revised form of the Absorption Scale extracted from Tellegen's Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (Tellegen, 1981; Tellegen & Atkinson, 1974) and the Short Imaginal Processes Inventory (Huba, Aneshensel, & Singer, 1981), a self-report questionnaire concerned with daydreaming activity, were administered to 2 samples of Ss (N = 479, N = 476), who also received the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (Shor & E. Orne, 1962).

Author(s): 
Hoyt, I. P.
Nadon, R.
Register, P. A.
Chorny, J.
Fleeson, W.
Grigorian, E. M.
Otto, L.
Kihlstrom, J. F.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

30 volunteer Ss practiced self-hypnosis for approximately 4 weeks and wrote a record of their experiences in a diary following each session. Imagery produced during self-hypnosis was coded in 2 ways: the imagery was either reality oriented or it was fantastic and had primary process qualities. Levels of imagery production remained virtually the same over a 4-week period. Self-hypnotic imagery was significantly greater for the female Ss than for the male Ss, particularly primary process imagery.

Author(s): 
Lombard, L. S.
Kahn, S. P.
Fromm, E.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

This study examined correlates of hypnotizability in children that had previously been reported for adults. Forty-two children (ages 7-14) completed the Fantasy Questionnaire (FQ), the Children's Social Desirability Questionnaire (CSDQ), the Zelter and LeBaron (1984) revision of the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale for Children (SHCS:C-R), and the Children's Fantasy Inventory: Absorption and Vividness Scales (CFI: A & V). The nine-item SHCS:C-R yields separate scores for Observed Behavior (OB), and Realness (R), as well as a Total Score (TS).

Author(s): 
Plotnick, A. B.
Payne, P. A.
O'Grady, D. J.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

The present article describes an assessment and therapy program for sexually abused children using hypnotherapeutic techniques which center on storytelling. Storytelling presents the therapist with an opportunity to use comforting suggestions, symbolism, and metaphor to provide the emotional distance necessary to deal with the trauma of abuse.

Author(s): 
Rhue, J. W.
Lynn, S. J.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

The present paper addresses 3 issues raised by Coe (1992). First, it maintains that the "altered state" issue of the 1960s remains buried in current dichotomous classifications of hypnosis theories as involving either "special processes" or the social-psychological position. Given the current diversity of the field, it appears imprudent to classify theorizing in either/or terms; additionally, despite a history of using the term "altered state" in a circular way, it is not an inherently circular formulation.

Author(s): 
Perry, C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

College students with no prior experience of hypnosis were assessed for fantasy proneness and dissociation. In a totally separate context, they were subsequently tested for their interpretations of hypnotic suggestions, hypnotic response expectancies, and hypnotizability. Contrary to Spanos and Gorassini's (1984) hypothesis, strategic enactment of suggested responses was rarely reported, and its endorsement was not correlated with hypnotic responsiveness. Suggestibility was significantly predicted by fantasy proneness and response expectancy, but not by dissociation.

Author(s): 
Silva, C. E.
Kirsch, I.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Reports

This study delineated two subgroups of highly hypnotizable subjects. The first (n = 19) entered trance rapidly, scored high on absorption, and described hypnosis as much like their rich and vivid waking fantasy life. The second subgroup of 15 took time to achieve a deep trance, saw hypnosis as very different from any prior experiences, and were more likely to exhibit amnesia for both hypnotic experience and waking fantasies.

Author(s): 
Barrett, D.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

In this article we address a number of issues relevant to the practice of psychotherapy and hypnotherapy: How reliable is memory? How are therapists' and clients' beliefs and expectancies related to pseudomemory formation? Are certain clients particularly vulnerable to pseudomemory creation? Does hypnosis pose special hazards for pseudomemory reports? What are the variables or factors that mediate hypnotic pseudomemories?

Author(s): 
Lynn, S. J.
Nash, M. R.

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