Fatty Acids

Publication Title: 
Zhong Yao Cai = Zhongyaocai = Journal of Chinese Medicinal Materials

The fatty oils in Terminulia chebula were extracted by supercritical-CO2 fluid extraetion, and their fatty acids and its relative contents were determined by GC-MS. 12 fatty acids were identified. Palmitic acid, linoleic acid and oleic acid of them are main constituents. Compared with petroleum ether extraction method, the extraction rate from SFE-CO2 is higher and extraction time shorter.

Author(s): 
Zhang, X.
Chen, C.
He, S.
Ge, F.
Publication Title: 
Systematic and Applied Microbiology

Five Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacteria were isolated from galls on different plant species in Hungary: strain 39/7(T) from Prunus cerasifera Myrobalan, strain 0 from grapevine var. Ezerjó, strain 7/1 from raspberry var. Findus and in Poland, strain C3.4.1 from Colt rootstock (Prunus avium × Prunus pseudocerasus) and strain CP17.2.2 from Prunus avium. Only one of these isolates, strain 0, is able to cause crown gall on different plant species.

Author(s): 
Pu?awska, Joanna
Willems, Anne
De Meyer, Sofie E.
Süle, Sandor
Publication Title: 
Integrative and Comparative Biology

More than 100 years ago, Max Rubner combined the fact that both metabolic rate and longevity of mammals varies with body size to calculate that "life energy potential" (lifetime energy turnover per kilogram) was relatively constant. This calculation linked longevity to aerobic metabolism which in turn led to the "rate-of-living" and ultimately the "oxidative stress" theories of aging. However, the link between metabolic rate and longevity is imperfect.

Author(s): 
Hulbert, A. J.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

DNA methylation patterns change as individuals grow older, and DNA methylation appears susceptible to modification by the diet. Thus DNA methylation may be a mechanism through which diet can affect aging and longevity. We propose that effects on DNA methylation also contribute to the extension in lifespan observed in response to dietary restriction. Relationships between diet-induced changes in DNA methylation and parallel effects on aging and/or lifespan could, of course, be purely associative.

Author(s): 
Ford, Dianne
Publication Title: 
Integrative and Comparative Biology

More than 100 years ago, Max Rubner combined the fact that both metabolic rate and longevity of mammals varies with body size to calculate that "life energy potential" (lifetime energy turnover per kilogram) was relatively constant. This calculation linked longevity to aerobic metabolism which in turn led to the "rate-of-living" and ultimately the "oxidative stress" theories of aging. However, the link between metabolic rate and longevity is imperfect.

Author(s): 
Hulbert, A. J.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

DNA methylation patterns change as individuals grow older, and DNA methylation appears susceptible to modification by the diet. Thus DNA methylation may be a mechanism through which diet can affect aging and longevity. We propose that effects on DNA methylation also contribute to the extension in lifespan observed in response to dietary restriction. Relationships between diet-induced changes in DNA methylation and parallel effects on aging and/or lifespan could, of course, be purely associative.

Author(s): 
Ford, Dianne
Publication Title: 
Annual Review of Nutrition
Author(s): 
Emken, E. A.
Publication Title: 
Revista ClÌnica EspaÒola
Author(s): 
S·nchez-Muniz, F. J.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Chronic caloric restriction (CR) has been demonstrated to increase longevity in lower species and studies are ongoing to evaluate its effect in higher species. A consistent metabolic feature of CR is improved insulin sensitivity and lowered lifetime glycemia, yet the mechanism responsible is currently unknown. However, the membrane's physiochemical properties, as determined by phospholipid composition, have been related to insulin action in animal and human studies and CR has been reported to alter membrane lipid content.

Author(s): 
Cefalu, W. T.
Wang, Z. Q.
Bell-Farrow, A. D.
Terry, J. G.
Sonntag, W.
Waite, M.
Parks, J.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Hardly an aspect of aging is more important than an organism's ability to withstand stress or to resist both internally and externally imposed insults. We know that as organisms loose their ability to resist these insults, aged organisms suffer more than the young. Therefore, a prime strategy for an organism's survival has been the evolutionarily adapted defense systems that guard against insult. For better survivability, an organism's defense system must be maximized to its full effect through well-coordinated networks of diverse biologically responsive elements.

Author(s): 
Yu, B. P.
Chung, H. Y.

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