Feasibility Studies

Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. METHODS: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Danhauer, Suzanne C.
Addington, Elizabeth L.
Sohl, Stephanie J.
Chaoul, Alejandro
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Although people with haematological malignancies have to endure long phases of therapy and immobility which is known to diminish their physical performance level, the advice to rest and avoid intensive exercises is still common practice. This recommendation is partly due to the severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia from which many patients suffer. The inability to perform activities of daily living restricts them, diminishes their quality of life and can influence medical therapy.

Author(s): 
Bergenthal, Nils
Will, Andrea
Streckmann, Fiona
Wolkewitz, Klaus-Dieter
Monsef, Ina
Engert, Andreas
Elter, Thomas
Skoetz, Nicole
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility and benefits of the Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT) intervention. DESIGN: This is the primary analysis of a non-controlled pretest-posttest pilot study to understand the feasibility and impact of MY-OT on balance, balance self-efficacy, and fall risk factor management in people with chronic stroke. SETTING: University research laboratory.

Author(s): 
Schmid, Arlene A.
Puymbroeck, Marieke Van
Portz, Jennifer D.
Atler, Karen E.
Fruhauf, Christine A.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility and benefits of the Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT) intervention. DESIGN: This is the primary analysis of a non-controlled pretest-posttest pilot study to understand the feasibility and impact of MY-OT on balance, balance self-efficacy, and fall risk factor management in people with chronic stroke. SETTING: University research laboratory.

Author(s): 
Schmid, Arlene A.
Puymbroeck, Marieke Van
Portz, Jennifer D.
Atler, Karen E.
Fruhauf, Christine A.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Research

BACKGROUND: Behavior change is integral to the prevention and treatment of many disorders associated with deleterious lifestyles. Rigorous scientific testing of behavior change interventions is an important goal for nursing research. APPROACH: The stage model for behavioral therapy development is recommended as a useful framework for evaluating behavior change strategies. The NIH model specifies three stages from initial testing of novel behavioral therapies to their dissemination in community settings.

Author(s): 
Marcus, Marianne T.
Liehr, Patricia R.
Schmitz, Joy
Moeller, F. Gerald
Swank, Paul
Fine, Micki
Cron, Stanley
Granmayeh, L. Kian
Carroll, Deidra D.
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: Reviews of yoga research that distinguish results of trials conducted during (versus after) cancer treatment are needed to guide future research and clinical practice. We therefore conducted a review of non-randomized studies and randomized controlled trials of yoga interventions for children and adults undergoing treatment for any cancer type. METHODS: Studies were identified via research databases and reference lists.

Author(s): 
Danhauer, Suzanne C.
Addington, Elizabeth L.
Sohl, Stephanie J.
Chaoul, Alejandro
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychosomatic Research

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study is to estimate the economic consequences of somatization disorder and functional somatic syndromes such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, defined as bodily distress syndrome (BDS), when mindfulness therapy is compared with enhanced treatment as usual. METHODS: A total of 119 BDS patients were randomized to mindfulness therapy or enhanced treatment as usual and compared with 5950 matched controls. Register data were analyzed from 10years before their inclusion to 15-month follow-up.

Author(s): 
Fjorback, Lone Overby
Carstensen, Tina
Arendt, Mikkel
Ornbøl, Eva
Walach, Harald
Rehfeld, Emma
Fink, Per
Publication Title: 
Burns: Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries

Adult burn patients experience pain during wound care despite pharmacological interventions. Additional nursing interventions are needed to improve pain management. A systematic review was undertaken in order to examine the implications of previous research for evidence based decisions concerning the use of non-pharmacological nursing interventions and for future research. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria and were discussed. The majority of the included studies concerned behavioural nursing interventions and focussed on promotion of psychological comfort.

Author(s): 
de Jong, A. E. E.
Middelkoop, E.
Faber, A. W.
Van Loey, N. E. E.
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the research evidence on the effectiveness of homeopathy for the treatment of depression and depressive disorders. METHODS: A comprehensive search of major biomedical databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library was conducted. Specialist complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) databases including AMED, CISCOM and Hom-Inform were also searched. Additionally, efforts were made to identify unpublished and ongoing research using relevant sources and experts in the field.

Author(s): 
Pilkington, K.
Kirkwood, G.
Rampes, H.
Fisher, P.
Richardson, J.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Although people with haematological malignancies have to endure long phases of therapy and immobility which is known to diminish their physical performance level, the advice to rest and avoid intensive exercises is still common practice. This recommendation is partly due to the severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia from which many patients suffer. The inability to perform activities of daily living restricts them, diminishes their quality of life and can influence medical therapy.

Author(s): 
Bergenthal, Nils
Will, Andrea
Streckmann, Fiona
Wolkewitz, Klaus-Dieter
Monsef, Ina
Engert, Andreas
Elter, Thomas
Skoetz, Nicole

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