Feeding and Eating Disorders

Publication Title: 
International Journal of Yoga Therapy

BACKGROUND: Yoga is a popular adjunct therapy for eating disorders (EDs). A systematic review and synthesis of the yoga literature is needed to guide treatment recommendations and future research. This article provides a review of studies that used yoga for preventing and treating EDs. METHOD: Databases were searched for peer-reviewed articles about yoga practice and ED symptoms and correlates.

Author(s): 
Klein, Jessalyn
Cook-Cottone, Catherine
Publication Title: 
Eating Disorders

The present study is an exploratory examination of the efficacy of the application of mindfulness-based interventions to the treatment of eating disorders. It employs a systematic review technique in which terms from the Psychological Index Terms of the American Psychological Association (APA) were chosen and analyzed in conjunction with Boolean operators. Using data obtained by the online consultation of references from 12 different bibliographical databases, 8 studies were included in the systematic review.

Author(s): 
Wanden-Berghe, Rocío Guardiola
Sanz-Valero, Javier
Wanden-Berghe, Carmina
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

More than one-third of U.S. adults over the age of 20 years are classified as obese and nearly two-thirds are overweight or obese. The prevalence of obesity among U.S. children and adolescents has almost tripled since 1980, with 17% of all youth and children now considered obese. Nine million children aged 6-19 years are overweight, making obesity the largest health care threat facing today's children. Historically, the arsenal against obesity has been primarily focused on interventions that increase physical activity and decrease caloric intake.

Author(s): 
Godsey, Judi
Publication Title: 
Eating Behaviors

This systematic review critically appraises the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of those with an eating disorder. Sixteen studies were included in the review. The results of this review show that the role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of those with an eating disorder is unclear and further studies should be conducted.

Author(s): 
Fogarty, Sarah
Smith, Caroline A.
Hay, Phillipa
Publication Title: 
Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Disturbances of volume-regulating mechanisms have already been implicated in the pathophysiology of eating disorders like anorexia or bulimia nervosa with the peptide hormones vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) being of special interest. Aim of the present study was to investigate, whether the expression of the corresponding genes was altered and if so, if these changes could be explained by epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation. We analyzed blood samples of 46 women suffering from anorexia (n=22) or bulimia nervosa (n=24) as well as of 30 healthy controls.

Author(s): 
Frieling, Helge
Bleich, Stefan
Otten, Jeannette
Rˆmer, Konstanze D.
Kornhuber, Johannes
De Zwaan, Martina
Jacoby, Georg E.
Wilhelm, Julia
Hillemacher, Thomas
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Eating Disorders

OBJECTIVE: The pathophysiology of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) has been linked to an impaired dopaminergic neurotransmission, still the origin of this disturbance remains unknown. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to evaluate whether the expression of dopaminergic genes is altered in the blood of patients suffering from eating disorders and if these alterations can be explained by changes in the promoter specific DNA methylation of the genes.

Author(s): 
Frieling, Helge
Rˆmer, Konstanze D.
Scholz, Sarah
Mittelbach, Franziska
Wilhelm, Julia
De Zwaan, Martina
Jacoby, Georg E.
Kornhuber, Johannes
Hillemacher, Thomas
Bleich, Stefan
Publication Title: 
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews

This review describes the various subtypes of eating disorders and examines factors associated with the risk of illness. It considers evidence that the development and maintenance of eating disorders is due to gene-environment interactions (GxE) that alter genetic expression via epigenetic processes. It describes how environmental factors such as those associated with nutrition and/or stress may cause epigenetic changes which have transcriptional and phenotypic effects, which, in turn, alter the long term risk of developing an eating disorder.

Author(s): 
Campbell, Iain C.
Mill, Jonathan
Uher, Rudolf
Schmidt, Ulrike
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Eating disorders are complex psychiatric disorders in which genes, environment, and gene-environment interactions (G◊E) have a role. Such G◊E may occur in adulthood or during development. They may also be modified by factors such as (mal)nutrition or stress and this may result in acute or long-term epigenetic modifications. This review discusses the potential for recent developments in epigenetics to address ongoing aetiological issues in eating disorders.

Author(s): 
Pjetri, Eneda
Schmidt, Ulrike
Kas, Martien J.
Campbell, Iain C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychiatric Research

OBJECTIVE: Previous findings indicate that women with Bulimia Nervosa (BN), when compared to women with no eating disorder (NED), tend to display elevated methylation in the promoter region of the DRD2 gene. The preceding would be compatible with evidence of generally reduced dopamine activity in people with BN. However, altered DNA methylation has also been associated with adverse environmental exposures (such as to childhood abuse) and with psychiatric disturbances (such as Borderline Personality Disorder: BPD).

Author(s): 
Groleau, Patricia
Joober, Ridha
Israel, Mimi
Zeramdini, Nadia
DeGuzman, Rosherrie
Steiger, Howard
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Eating Disorders

OBJECTIVE: To depict the processes through which animals and human beings engage their environment in continuously evolving states of conflict and cooperation. METHOD: Descriptive literature review. RESULTS: Life history outcomes are more relative than they are absolute. Genetic variations play a crucial role, but heavily influencing behavioral outcomes, psychopathology included, are external cues that epigenetically remodel DNA along experience-dependent signaling pathways. The result is phenotypes that either optimize adjustment, or constrain it.

Author(s): 
Strober, Michael
Peris, Tara
Steiger, Howard

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Feeding and Eating Disorders