Fees, Medical

Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Economics

Several recent studies have shown that physician participation in state Medicaid programs is directly related to the generosity of their reimbursement levels. The implication is that when states reduce fees, Medicaid eligibles suffer because their access to physicians' services is thereby limited. The results presented in this paper do not support this implication.

Author(s): 
Long, S. H.
Settle, R. F.
Stuart, B. C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Chronic Diseases

Little is known about how generosity of insurance and population characteristics affect quantity or appropriateness of antibiotic use. Using insurance claims for antibiotics from 5765 non-elderly people who lived in six sites in the United States and were randomly assigned to insurance plans varying by level of cost-sharing, we describe how antibiotic use varies by insurance plan, diagnosis and health status, geographic area, and demographic characteristics.

Author(s): 
Foxman, B.
Valdez, R. B.
Lohr, K. N.
Goldberg, G. A.
Newhouse, J. P.
Brook, R. H.
Publication Title: 
Archives of General Psychiatry

Reductions in the generosity of fee-for-service insurance lower the use of general medical and mental health services, but do they lead to lower mental health status for the covered population? We addressed this question using data from the RAND Corporation Health Insurance Experiment. Families in six sites in the United States were randomly assigned to one of 14 insurance plans for three- or five-year periods.

Author(s): 
Wells, K. B.
Manning, W. G.
Valdez, R. B.
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

Every year since 1984, Congress has expanded Medicaid to cover an increasing proportion of low-income children. In this study, a multivariate analysis of data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey was used to determine whether expanded Medicaid eligibility is likely to be effective in encouraging recommended preventive visits for low-income, preschool children.

Author(s): 
Short, P. F.
Lefkowitz, D. C.
Publication Title: 
Health Affairs (Project Hope)

This study examines the effects of physician fees on children's use of preventive and illness-related ambulatory physician services under the Medicaid program. Using data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES), we examine the effects of Medicaid fee generosity on physician service use and overall ambulatory physician spending. The results indicate that more generous fees are associated with a greater likelihood of having a doctor's office as a usual source of care and a higher number of preventive visits at office-based sites of care.

Author(s): 
Cohen, J. W.
Cunningham, P. J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Aging & Social Policy

The prospect of budget cuts in Medicare is likely to result in less generous reimbursements from Medicare and thus affects physicians' willingness to accept Medicare patients with the reduced payments. This study examines physicians' decisions about case-by-case assignment and participation in Medicare in relation to Medicare reimbursement generosity. A two-part model is applied to a database from a national survey of physicians.

Author(s): 
Zhang, M.
Publication Title: 
Inquiry: A Journal of Medical Care Organization, Provision and Financing

Controlling for state fixed effects and other factors, this paper estimates the effect of the generosity of Medicaid physician payment levels on the volume and site of ambulatory care received by Medicaid patients compared to privately insured patients. Results indicate that cuts in Medicaid physician fees lead to statistically significant reductions in the number of visits for Medicaid patients compared to privately insured patients.

Author(s): 
Decker, Sandra L.
Publication Title: 
Health Services Research

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of a coverage expansion versus a Medicaid physician fee increase on children's utilization of physician services. PRIMARY DATA SOURCE: National Health Interview Survey (1997-2009). STUDY DESIGN: We use the Children's Health Insurance Program, enacted in 1997, as a natural experiment, and we performed a panel data regression analysis using the state-year as the unit of observation.

Author(s): 
White, Chapin
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Economics

I investigate how changes in fees paid to Medicaid physicians affect take-up among children in low-income families. The existing literature suggests that the low level of Medicaid fee payments to physicians reduces their willingness to see Medicaid patients, thus creating an access-to-care problem for these patients. For the identical service, current Medicaid reimbursement rates are only about 65 percent of those covered by Medicare. Increasing the relative payments of Medicaid would increase its perceived value, as it would provide better access to health care for Medicaid beneficiaries.

Author(s): 
Hahn, Youjin
Publication Title: 
American Heart Journal

The reuse of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon catheters has recently been proposed as a way of containing costs. Our aim was to examine patient acceptability of this strategy. We asked 100 consecutive patients scheduled for potential or definite PTCA whether they would permit the use of sterilized, reused balloon catheters. We collected demographic, clinical, angiographic, and insurance-status data on all patients. Sixty-eight patients responded that they would have allowed reused equipment (group 1). Thirty-two patients would have refused (group 2).

Author(s): 
Vaitkus, P. T.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Fees, Medical