Female

Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

CONTEXT: Self-management strategies for pain hold substantial promise as a means of reducing pain and improving function among older adults with chronic pain, but their use in this age group has not been well defined. OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence regarding self-management interventions for pain due to musculoskeletal disorders among older adults.

Author(s): 
Reid, M. Carrington
Papaleontiou, Maria
Ong, Anthony
Breckman, Risa
Wethington, Elaine
Pillemer, Karl
Publication Title: 
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Physical activity (PA) is emerging as a safe and effective tool in the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders. PA subtypes include aerobic, resistance, flexibility, neuromotor (involving balance, agility and co-ordination), mind-body (e.g. tai chi, qi gong and yoga) and mixed type trainings. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that PA subtypes can have positive clinical effects, however the effects on the symptomatology may vary according to the PA subtype.

Author(s): 
Eyre, Harris A.
Baune, Bernhard T.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: The aim of this article is to summarize and critically evaluate the evidence from systematic reviews (SRs) of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for lowering blood lipid levels (BLL). METHODS: Eight electronic databases were searched until March 2016. Additionally, all the retrieved references were inspected manually for further relevant papers. Systematic reviews were considered eligible, if they included patients of any age and/or gender with elevated blood lipid levels using any type of CAM.

Author(s): 
Posadzki, Paul
Albedah, Abdullah M. N.
Khalil, Mohamed M. K.
AlQaed, Meshari S.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an integrative medicine approach to the management of asthma compared to standard clinical care on quality of life (QOL) and clinical outcomes. METHODS: This was a prospective parallel group repeated measurement randomized design. Participants were adults aged 18 to 80 years with asthma. The intervention consisted of six group sessions on the use of nutritional manipulation, yoga techniques, and journaling. Participants also received nutritional supplements: fish oil, vitamin C, and a standardized hops extract.

Author(s): 
Kligler, Benjamin
Homel, Peter
Blank, Arthur E.
Kenney, Jeanne
Levenson, Hanniel
Merrell, Woodson
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the profile, evaluation criteria and fatigue treatment. BACKGROUND: Fatigue, characterised by tiredness, weakness or lack of energy, involves physical, cognitive and emotional aspects. Its aetiology is not well defined and the prevalence ranges from 30-70% in women with breast cancer, reaching up to 80% when they are undergoing radiotherapy. This is one of the most frequent side effects of radiotherapy, and it may interfere with self-esteem, social activities and quality of life. DESIGN: Literature systematic review.

Author(s): 
Alcântara-Silva, Tereza Raquel de M.
Freitas-Junior, Ruffo
Freitas, Nilceana M. A.
Machado, Graziela D. P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVE: To examine published evidence on the effectiveness of mind-body interventions during pregnancy on perceived stress, mood, and perinatal outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Computerized searches of PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library. STUDY SELECTION: Twelve out of 64 published intervention studies between 1980 and February 2007 of healthy, adult pregnant women met criteria for review. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Studies were categorized by type of mind-body modality used. Progressive muscle relaxation was the most common intervention.

Author(s): 
Beddoe, Amy E.
Lee, Kathryn A.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the cancer most frequently diagnosed in women worldwide. Even though survival rates are continually increasing, breast cancer is often associated with long-term psychological distress, chronic pain, fatigue and impaired quality of life. Yoga comprises advice for an ethical lifestyle, spiritual practice, physical activity, breathing exercises and meditation. It is a complementary therapy that is commonly recommended for breast cancer-related impairments and has been shown to improve physical and mental health in people with different cancer types.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Klose, Petra
Lange, Silke
Langhorst, Jost
Dobos, Gustav J.
Publication Title: 
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics

BACKGROUND: Psychosocial intervention has been suggested as a potentially effective supplement to medical treatment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but no reviews so far have quantified the existing research in terms of both psychological and physical health outcomes. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials evaluating the effects of psychosocial interventions on psychological and physical health outcomes in COPD. METHODS: Two independent raters screened 1,491 references for eligibility.

Author(s): 
Farver-Vestergaard, Ingeborg
Jacobsen, Dorte
Zachariae, Robert
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To summarize and evaluate evidence for the effect of yoga on menstrual disorders. METHODS: PubMed, CINAHL/MEDLINE, Web of Science, AMED, and Scopus were searched for English-language literature relevant to the review question. All primary research studies were included. RESULTS: Fifteen studies described in 18 papers were included in the review. A range of yoga interventions were used. Some studies used a combination of Asana, Pranayama, and other yogic relaxation or meditation techniques.

Author(s): 
Oates, Jennifer
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Sleep disorders are one of the most common difficulties facing older people. Meditative movement interventions (MMIs), a new category of exercise integrating physical activity and meditation (e.g., t'ai chi, yoga, and qigong), may benefit older people with sleep problems. This systematic review synthesized the evidence on the effect of MMIs on older people's quality of sleep.

Author(s): 
Wu, Wei-Wei
Kwong, Enid
Lan, Xiu-Yan
Jiang, Xiao-Ying

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