Fibromyalgia

Publication Title: 
Schmerz (Berlin, Germany)

BACKGROUND: The scheduled update to the German S3 guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften", AWMF; registration number 041/004) was planned starting in March 2011. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The development of the guidelines was coordinated by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Pain Therapy ("Deutsche Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Schmerztherapie", DIVS), 9 scientific medical societies and 2 patient self-help organizations.

Author(s): 
Langhorst, J.
Häuser, W.
Bernardy, K.
Lucius, H.
Settan, M.
Winkelmann, A.
Musial, F.
Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatics

OBJECTIVE: Of the 34 million adult Americans (17%) using mind-body medicine therapies, 8 million (24%) have anxiety/depression. The evidence for using mind-body therapies to address varying depressive symptoms in populations with and without other chronic comorbidities is reviewed. METHODS: Systematic literature searches of PubMed (Medline), Embase, CINAHL, and the seven databases encompassed by Current Contents, Web of Science, and Web of Knowledge were conducted.

Author(s): 
D'Silva, Sahana
Poscablo, Cristina
Habousha, Racheline
Kogan, Mikhail
Kligler, Benjamin
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pain Research

Complementary and alternative medicine includes a number of exercise modalities, such as tai chi, qigong, yoga, and a variety of lesser-known movement therapies. A meta-analysis of the current literature was conducted estimating the effect size of the different modalities, study quality and bias, and adverse events. The level of research has been moderately weak to date, but most studies report a medium-to-high effect size in pain reduction.

Author(s): 
Mist, Scott David
Firestone, Kari A.
Jones, Kim Dupree
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article was to present a methodology incorporating existing guidelines and tools for systematic reviews and to evaluate the Delphi survey 33 key component recommendations of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions as a tool for a systematic review in fibromyalgia studies. DATA SOURCES: Databases searched included PubMed, Ovid Medline, PsychINFO, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, ALT HealthWatch, PEDro, and Web of Science.

Author(s): 
Fischer-White, Tamara G.
Anderson, Joel G.
Taylor, Ann Gill
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendation for yoga as an ancillary intervention in rheumatic diseases. METHODS: Medline/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library and IndMED were searched through February 2013. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing yoga with control interventions in patients with rheumatic diseases were included. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane Back Review Group risk of bias tool.

Author(s): 
Cramer, Holger
Lauche, Romy
Langhorst, Jost
Dobos, Gustav
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: There have been several systematic reviews attempting to evaluate the efficacy of possible treatments for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM). However, information regarding the efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has not been comprehensively or systematically covered in these reviews, despite its frequent use in the patient community. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to systematically review and evaluate the current literature related to alternative and complementary treatments for ME/CFS and FM.

Author(s): 
Porter, Nicole S.
Jason, Leonard A.
Boulton, Aaron
Bothne, Nancy
Coleman, Blair
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: There have been several systematic reviews attempting to evaluate the efficacy of possible treatments for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM). However, information regarding the efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has not been comprehensively or systematically covered in these reviews, despite its frequent use in the patient community. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to systematically review and evaluate the current literature related to alternative and complementary treatments for ME/CFS and FM.

Author(s): 
Porter, Nicole S.
Jason, Leonard A.
Boulton, Aaron
Bothne, Nancy
Coleman, Blair
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried

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