Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal

Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

We describe a new chronological lifespan (CLS) assay for the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Yeast CLS assays monitor the loss of cell viability in a culture over time, and this new assay shows a continuous decline in viability without detectable regrowth until all cells in the culture are dead. Thus, the survival curve is not altered by the generation of mutants that can grow during the experiments, and one can monitor the entire lifespan of a strain until the number of viable cells has decreased over 10(6)-fold.

Author(s): 
Chen, Bo-Ruei
Runge, Kurt W.
Publication Title: 
Molecular genetics and genomics: MGG

The heat shock factor (HSF), a protein evolutionarily conserved from yeasts to human, regulates the expression of a set of proteins called heat shock proteins (HSPs), many of which function as molecular chaperones. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the HSF binds to the 5' upstream region of YGR146C and activates its transcription. YGR146C encodes a functional homolog of ecl1 (+), ecl2 (+), and ecl3 (+) of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. At present, these Ecl1 family genes, which are extenders of chronological lifespan, have been identified only in fungi groups.

Author(s): 
Ohtsuka, Hokuto
Azuma, Kenko
Murakami, Hiroshi
Aiba, Hirofumi
Publication Title: 
Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry

The anti-aging effects of phloridzin on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated by employing a replicative lifespan assay of the K6001 yeast strain. After administrating phloridzin at doses of 3, 10, and 30 µM, the lifespan of the yeast was significantly prolonged in comparison with the untreated group (p<0.01, p<0.001). To determine the mechanism of action, anti-oxidative experiments and ROS assay were performed.

Author(s): 
Xiang, Lan
Sun, Kaiyue
Lu, Jun
Weng, Yufang
Taoka, Akiko
Sakagami, Youji
Qi, Jianhua
Publication Title: 
PLoS genetics

Aging is characterized by the accumulation of damaged cellular macromolecules caused by declining repair and elimination pathways. An integral component employed by cells to counter toxic protein aggregates is the conserved ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS). Previous studies have described an age-dependent decline of proteasomal function and increased longevity correlates with sustained proteasome capacity in centenarians and in naked mole rats, a long-lived rodent. Proof for a direct impact of enhanced proteasome function on longevity, however, is still lacking.

Author(s): 
Kruegel, Undine
Robison, Brett
Dange, Thomas
Kahlert, G¸nther
Delaney, Joe R.
Kotireddy, Soumya
Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro
Tsuchiyama, Scott
Murakami, Christopher J.
Schleit, Jennifer
Sutphin, George
Carr, Daniel
Tar, Krisztina
Dittmar, Gunnar
Kaeberlein, Matt
Kennedy, Brian K.
Schmidt, Marion
Publication Title: 
Nature
Author(s): 
Lee, Siu Sylvia
Ruvkun, Gary
Publication Title: 
Molecular Microbiology

Barring genetic manipulation, the diet known as calorie restriction (CR) is currently the only way to slow down ageing in mammals. The fact that CR works on most species, even microorganisms, implies a conserved underlying mechanism. Recent findings in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that CR extends lifespan because it is a mild biological stressor that activates Sir2, a key component of yeast longevity and the founding member of the sirtuin family of deacetylases.

Author(s): 
Lamming, Dudley W.
Wood, Jason G.
Sinclair, David A.
Publication Title: 
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

Studies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal four processes determining life span: metabolism, stress resistance, chromatin-dependent gene regulation, and genome stability. The retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in changes in nuclear gene expression, extends yeast life span and is induced during normal aging. This response involves extensive metabolic adaptations. The retrograde response links metabolism and genome stability during yeast aging. A reduction in the availability of nutrients also extends yeast life span.

Author(s): 
Jazwinski, S. Michal
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

We describe a new chronological lifespan (CLS) assay for the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Yeast CLS assays monitor the loss of cell viability in a culture over time, and this new assay shows a continuous decline in viability without detectable regrowth until all cells in the culture are dead. Thus, the survival curve is not altered by the generation of mutants that can grow during the experiments, and one can monitor the entire lifespan of a strain until the number of viable cells has decreased over 10(6)-fold.

Author(s): 
Chen, Bo-Ruei
Runge, Kurt W.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Aging is a highly complex, multifactorial process. We use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to study the mechanisms of cellular aging in multicellular eukaryotes. To address the inherent complexity of aging from a systems perspective and to build an integrative model of aging process, we investigated the effect of calorie restriction (CR), a low-calorie dietary regimen, on the metabolic history of chronologically aging yeast.

Author(s): 
Goldberg, Alexander A.
Bourque, Simon D.
Kyryakov, Pavlo
Gregg, Christopher
Boukh-Viner, Tatiana
Beach, Adam
Burstein, Michelle T.
Machkalyan, Gayane
Richard, Vincent
Rampersad, Sonia
Cyr, David
Milijevic, Svetlana
Titorenko, Vladimir I.
Publication Title: 
PLoS genetics

Aging and longevity are complex traits influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control replicative lifespan, we employed an outbred Saccharomyces cerevisiae model, generated by crossing a vineyard and a laboratory strain. The predominant QTL mapped to the rDNA, with the vineyard rDNA conferring a lifespan increase of 41%. The lifespan extension was independent of Sir2 and Fob1, but depended on a polymorphism in the rDNA origin of replication from the vineyard strain that reduced origin activation relative to the laboratory origin.

Author(s): 
Kwan, Elizabeth X.
Foss, Eric J.
Tsuchiyama, Scott
Alvino, Gina M.
Kruglyak, Leonid
Kaeberlein, Matt
Raghuraman, M. K.
Brewer, Bonita J.
Kennedy, Brian K.
Bedalov, Antonio

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