Gene Frequency

Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Centenarians are people who escaped from major common diseases, including cancer, and reached the extreme limits of human life-span. The analysis of demographic data indicates that cancer incidence and mortality show a levelling off around the age of 85-90 years, and suggests that oldest old people and centenarians are protected from cancer onset and progression.

Author(s): 
BonafË, Massimiliano
Barbi, Cristiana
Storci, Gianluca
Salvioli, Stefano
Capri, Miriam
Olivieri, Fabiola
Valensin, Silvana
Monti, Daniela
Gonos, Efstathios S.
De Benedictis, Giovanna
Franceschi, Claudio
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

The exceptional longevity of centenarians is due in part to inherited genetic factors, as deduced from data that show that first degree relatives of centenarians live longer and have reduced overall mortality. In recent years, a number of groups have performed genetic association studies on long-living individuals (LLI) and young controls to identify alleles that are either positively or negatively selected in the centenarian population as consequence of a demographic pressure. Many of the reported studies have shown genetic loci associated with longevity.

Author(s): 
Novelli, Valeria
Viviani Anselmi, Chiara
Roncarati, Roberta
Guffanti, Guia
Malovini, Alberto
Piluso, Giulio
Puca, Annibale Alessandro
Publication Title: 
Molecular Biology Reports

The PTPN22 gene, located on chromosome 1p13, encoding lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), plays a crucial role in the negative control of T lymphocyte activation. Since the age-related change in T-cell signal transduction may be one of the most important causes of cell-mediated immune response decline with ageing, we performed a population-based association study to test whether the PTPN22 1858C>T (R620W) functional polymorphism affects the ability to survive to old age and to reach even exceptional life expectancy.

Author(s): 
Napolioni, Valerio
Natali, Annalia
Saccucci, Patrizia
Lucarini, Nazzareno
Publication Title: 
Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands)

Our study purpose was to compare a disease-related polygenic profile that combined a total of 62 genetic variants among (i) people reaching exceptional longevity, i.e., centenarians (n = 54, 100-108 years, 48 women) and (ii) ethnically matched healthy controls (n = 87, 19-43 years, 47 women).

Author(s): 
Ruiz, Jonatan R.
Fiuza-Luces, Carmen
Buxens, Amaya
Cano-Nieto, Amalia
GÛmez-Gallego, FÈlix
Santiago, Catalina
RodrÌguez-Romo, Gabriel
Garatachea, Nuria
Lao, JosÈ I.
Mor·n, MarÌa
Lucia, Alejandro
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

Leukocyte telomere length is widely considered a biomarker of human age and in many studies indicative of health or disease. We have obtained quantitative estimates of telomere length from blood leukocytes in a population sample, confirming results of previous studies that telomere length significantly decreases with age. Telomere length was also positively associated with several measures of healthy aging, but this relationship was dependent on age.

Author(s): 
Kim, Sangkyu
Bi, Xiuhua
Czarny-Ratajczak, Malwina
Dai, Jianliang
Welsh, David A.
Myers, Leann
Welsch, Michael A.
Cherry, Katie E.
Arnold, Jonathan
Poon, Leonard W.
Jazwinski, S. Michal
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Like most complex phenotypes, exceptional longevity is thought to reflect a combined influence of environmental (e.g., lifestyle choices, where we live) and genetic factors. To explore the genetic contribution, we undertook a genome-wide association study of exceptional longevity in 801 centenarians (median age at death 104 years) and 914 genetically matched healthy controls.

Author(s): 
Sebastiani, Paola
Solovieff, Nadia
Dewan, Andrew T.
Walsh, Kyle M.
Puca, Annibale
Hartley, Stephen W.
Melista, Efthymia
Andersen, Stacy
Dworkis, Daniel A.
Wilk, Jemma B.
Myers, Richard H.
Steinberg, Martin H.
Montano, Monty
Baldwin, Clinton T.
Hoh, Josephine
Perls, Thomas T.
Publication Title: 
Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands)

Longevity phenotype in humans results from the influence of environmental and genetic factors. Few gene polymorphisms have been identified so far with a modest effect on lifespan leaving room for the search of other players in the longevity game. It has been recently demonstrated that targeted disruption of the mouse homolog of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene (AGTR1) translates into marked prolongation of animal lifespan (Benigni et al., J Clin Invest 119(3):524-530, 2009).

Author(s): 
Benigni, Ariela
Orisio, Silvia
Noris, Marina
Iatropoulos, Paraskevas
Castaldi, Davide
Kamide, Kei
Rakugi, Hiromi
Arai, Yasumichi
Todeschini, Marta
Ogliari, Giulia
Imai, Enyu
Gondo, Yasuyuki
Hirose, Nobuyoshi
Mari, Daniela
Remuzzi, Giuseppe
Publication Title: 
Angiology

Single nucleotide polymorphisms of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) such as rs1799752, nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) such as rs28362491 and cholesteryl ester transport protein (CETP) such as rs708272 (TaqB1) and rs5882 (I405V) were evaluated in nonagenarians, centenarians, and average life span individuals (controls). The study population (n = 307; 190 nonagenarians, 12 centenarians and 105 middle-aged controls) was genotyped for ACE, NFkB, and CETP genetic variants.

Author(s): 
Kolovou, Genovefa
Kolovou, Vana
Vasiliadis, Ioannis
Giannakopoulou, Vasiliki
Mihas, Constantinos
Bilianou, Helen
Kollia, Aikaterini
Papadopoulou, Evaggelia
Marvaki, Apostolia
Goumas, Georgos
Kalogeropoulos, Petros
Limperi, Sotiria
Katsiki, Niki
Mavrogeni, Sophie
Publication Title: 
Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands)

Longevity phenotype in humans results from the influence of environmental and genetic factors. Few gene polymorphisms have been identified so far with a modest effect on lifespan leaving room for the search of other players in the longevity game. It has been recently demonstrated that targeted disruption of the mouse homolog of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene (AGTR1) translates into marked prolongation of animal lifespan (Benigni et al., J Clin Invest 119(3):524-530, 2009).

Author(s): 
Benigni, Ariela
Orisio, Silvia
Noris, Marina
Iatropoulos, Paraskevas
Castaldi, Davide
Kamide, Kei
Rakugi, Hiromi
Arai, Yasumichi
Todeschini, Marta
Ogliari, Giulia
Imai, Enyu
Gondo, Yasuyuki
Hirose, Nobuyoshi
Mari, Daniela
Remuzzi, Giuseppe
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Like most complex phenotypes, exceptional longevity is thought to reflect a combined influence of environmental (e.g., lifestyle choices, where we live) and genetic factors. To explore the genetic contribution, we undertook a genome-wide association study of exceptional longevity in 801 centenarians (median age at death 104 years) and 914 genetically matched healthy controls.

Author(s): 
Sebastiani, Paola
Solovieff, Nadia
Dewan, Andrew T.
Walsh, Kyle M.
Puca, Annibale
Hartley, Stephen W.
Melista, Efthymia
Andersen, Stacy
Dworkis, Daniel A.
Wilk, Jemma B.
Myers, Richard H.
Steinberg, Martin H.
Montano, Monty
Baldwin, Clinton T.
Hoh, Josephine
Perls, Thomas T.

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