General Surgery

Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Disagreement over the legitimacy of direct sterilization continues within Catholic moral debate, with painful and at times confusing ramifications for Catholic healthcare systems. This paper argues that the medical profession should be construed as a key moral authority in this debate, on two grounds. First, the recent revival of neo-Aristotelianism in moral philosophy as applied to medical ethics has brought out the inherently moral dimensions of the history and current practice of medicine.

Author(s): 
Cowdin, Daniel M.
Tuohey, John F.
Publication Title: 
Der Urologe. Ausg. A

The growth of the city's population, rapid advances in medical science, the increasing understanding of the importance of hygiene and, finally, the demand for health care led to the erection of a modern 353-bed municipal hospital complex at Pommerensdorf, Apfelallee, which was officially opened in 1879. From the very beginning of its existence, the municipal hospital was constantly in the process of extension and rebuilding. A hospital base was set up and new departments and clinics were opened. In 1937, the number of the hospital beds had increased to 1,004.

Author(s): 
Zajaczkowski, T.
Wojewski-Zajaczkowski, E. M.
Publication Title: 
World Journal of Surgery

The eponymous of the Jurasz procedure is Antoni Tomasz Jurasz (1882-1961). The procedure is a standard approach to treating mature pancreatic pseudocysts that are in contact with the stomach, although recent advances in instrumentation have empowered surgeons to perform pseudocystogastrostomy laparoscopically for this problem. Dr. Jurasz was born in Germany but felt himself as Polish as his ancestors. He graduated from Heidelberg with a degree in medicine. Over the following years, he developed a German surgery school, especially helping with the achievements of Erich Lexer and Erwin Payr.

Author(s): 
Magowska, Anita
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine

Seven cases of psychiatric consultations on medical and surgical wards are reviewed to show how intrapsychic conflicts in the staff may make the consultation request appear inappropriate. On deeper examination, such requests may signify staff dysfunction caused by arousal of conflictual feelings about the behavior of illness of the patient. Mutilated, mute patients appear to arouse fear of agression in their caregivers, who in turn reject such patients, see them as alien and violent, and become illogical in their management.

Author(s): 
Kucharski, A.
Groves, J. E.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

Questionnaires were distributed to 346 fourth-year students in nine medical schools. The students were asked to state their selected specialty and to rank the importance that each of 25 influences, listed as questionnaire items, had had in making their choice of specialty. Factor analysis showed that particular items were significantly associated with particular factors.

Author(s): 
Schwartz, R. W.
Haley, J. V.
Williams, C.
Jarecky, R. K.
Strodel, W. E.
Young, B.
Griffen, W. O.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Journal of Surgery. Journal Canadien De Chirurgie

The present demoralized state of Canadian surgery is due to a number of short-term influences. They include financial restraints, the desire of government agencies to off-load blame for unpopular decisions onto doctors and altered public expectations. The major long-term challenge will be a shortage of physicians and a severe shortage of general surgeons because of the superimposition of longer-term trends in medical demographics on short-term political reactions to a perceived oversupply of doctors. General surgeons need to identify the significant, long-term threats and challenges.

Author(s): 
Heughan, C.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore

In this lecture I will discuss the history of medicine and surgery in ancient China and India, and examine the value systems underpinning medical and surgical practice in these two civilizations. I will touch on some of the enduring "Asian" values that may be abstracted from the past to ensure that modern medicine along with surgery remains first and foremost a moral activity that renders public service, and is practiced with compassion and altruism. I will outline briefly the spread of Western or allopathic medicine into Asia and the rest of the world.

Author(s): 
Soin, K.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PROBLEM STATEMENT AND BACKGROUND: The evaluation of professionalism often relies on the observation and interpretation of students' behaviors; however, little research is available regarding faculty's interpretations of these behaviors. METHOD: Interviews were conducted with 30 faculty, who were asked to respond to five videotaped scenarios in which students are placed in professionally challenging situations. Behaviors were catalogued by person and by scenario. RESULTS: There was little agreement between faculty about what students should and should not do in each scenario.

Author(s): 
Ginsburg, Shiphra
Regehr, Glenn
Lingard, Lorelei
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Surgery

BACKGROUND: Teaching professionalism effectively to fully engaged residents is a significant challenge. A key question is whether the integration of professionalism into residency education leads to a change in resident culture. METHODS: The goal of this study was to assess whether professionalism has taken root in the surgical resident culture 3 years after implementing our professionalism curriculum.

Author(s): 
Hochberg, Mark S.
Berman, Russell S.
Kalet, Adina L.
Zabar, Sondra R.
Gillespie, Colleen
Pachter, H. Leon
Surgical Professionalism and Interpersonal Communications Education Study Group
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Surgery

PURPOSE: This study assesses interest in international volunteer work by members of the American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) and attempts to identify demographics, motivations, obstacles, and institutional issues of the respondents. METHODS: An online survey service was used to send a 25-question survey to all APSA members with email addresses in November 2009. An answer to all questions was not required. Written comments were encouraged. RESULTS: The survey was sent to 807 members of whom 316 responded, for a response rate of 39%.

Author(s): 
Butler, Marilyn W.
Krishnaswami, Sanjay
Rothstein, David H.
Cusick, Robert A.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - General Surgery