Glycolysis

Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

The aqueous extract from Terminalia chebula was tested for its ability to inhibit the growth and some physiological functions of Streptococcus mutans. The extract strongly inhibited the growth, sucrose induced adherence and glucan induced aggregation of S. mutans. Mouthrinsing with a 10% solution of the extract inhibited the salivary bacterial count and salivary glycolysis.

Author(s): 
Jagtap, A. G.
Karkera, S. G.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice

AIM: Many weapons are available in the arsenal of a dental professional to combat dental caries, which is almost ubiquitously present. From a public health perspective, most of these weapons are far from being an ideal drug. Hence, there is a demand for better and effective antibacterial agents. This factor stimulated the process of the present study. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula on Streptococcus mutans. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dried ripe fruits of Terminalia chebula were procured and powdered.

Author(s): 
Nayak, Sushma S.
Ankola, Anil V.
Metgud, Sharda C.
Bolmal, Uday Kumar
Publication Title: 
Current Opinion in Oncology

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to highlight recent studies on mammalian sirtuins that coordinately regulate cellular metabolic homeostasis upon fasting and to summarize the beneficial effects of fasting on carcinogenesis and cancer therapy. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have demonstrated that fasting may protect normal cells and mice from the metabolic conditions that are harmful as well as decrease the incidence of carcinogenesis. Fasting could also slow the tumor growth and augment the efficacy of certain systemic agents/chemotherapy drugs in various cancers.

Author(s): 
Zhu, Yueming
Yan, Yufan
Gius, David R.
Vassilopoulos, Athanassios
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Mutations in the clk-1 gene of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans result in slowed development, sluggish adult behaviors, and an increased lifespan. CLK-1 is a mitochondrial polypeptide with sequence and functional conservation from human to yeast. Coq7p, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue, is essential for ubiquinone (coenzyme Q or Q) synthesis and therefore respiration. However, based on assays of respiratory function, it has been reported that the primary defect in the C. elegans clk-1 mutants is not in Q biosynthesis.

Author(s): 
Jonassen, T.
Larsen, P. L.
Clarke, C. F.
Publication Title: 
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

By applying calorie restriction (CR) at 30-50% below ad libitum levels, studies in numerous species have reported increased life span, reduced incidence and delayed onset of age-related diseases, improved stress resistance, and decelerated functional decline. Whether this nutritional intervention is relevant to human aging remains to be determined; however, evidence emerging from CR studies in nonhuman primates suggests that response to CR in primates parallels that observed in rodents. To evaluate CR effects in humans, clinical trials have been initiated.

Author(s): 
Ingram, Donald K.
Anson, R. Michael
de Cabo, Rafael
Mamczarz, Jacek
Zhu, Min
Mattison, Julie
Lane, Mark A.
Roth, George S.
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

When considering all possible aging interventions evaluated to date, it is clear that calorie restriction (CR) remains the most robust. Studies in numerous species have demonstrated that reduction of calories 30-50% below ad libitum levels of a nutritious diet can increase lifespan, reduce the incidence and delay the onset of age-related diseases, improve stress resistance, and decelerate functional decline. A current major focus of this research area is whether this nutritional intervention is relevant to human aging.

Author(s): 
Ingram, Donald K.
Zhu, Min
Mamczarz, Jacek
Zou, Sige
Lane, Mark A.
Roth, George S.
deCabo, Rafael
Publication Title: 
Biogerontology

The possibility is discussed that dietary restriction modulates ageing and onset of related pathologies by, in addition to upregulation of proteolysis, suppression of glycolysis which in turn decreases generation of methylglyoxal (MG), a highly toxic glycating agent which can provoke cellular senescence and many age-related pathologies. This proposal is supported by the observation that intermittent feeding can mimic dietary restriction's effects on mouse lifespan without any overall reduction in calorie intake.

Author(s): 
Hipkiss, Alan R.
Publication Title: 
Interdisciplinary Topics in Gerontology

Elevated blood glucose associated with diabetes produces progressive and apparently irreversible damage to many cell types. Conversely, reduction of glucose extends life span in yeast, and dietary restriction reduces blood glucose. Therefore it has been hypothesized that cumulative toxic effects of glucose drive at least some aspects of the aging process and, conversely, that protective effects of dietary restriction are mediated by a reduction in exposure to glucose.

Author(s): 
Mobbs, Charles V.
Mastaitis, Jason W.
Zhang, Minhua
Isoda, Fumiko
Cheng, Hui
Yen, Kelvin
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Recent evidence suggests that calorie restriction and specifically reduced glucose metabolism induces mitochondrial metabolism to extend life span in various model organisms, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and possibly mice.

Author(s): 
Ristow, Michael
Zarse, Kim
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Calorie restriction (CR) remains the most robust environmental intervention for altering aging processes and increasing healthspan and lifespan. Emerging from progress made in many nonhuman models, current research has expanded to formal, controlled human studies of CR. Since long-term CR requires a major commitment of will power and long-term negative consequences remain to be determined, the concept of a calorie restriction mimetic (CRM) has become a new area of investigation within gerontology.

Author(s): 
Ingram, Donald K.
Roth, George S.

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