Grief

Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVES: To determine what evidence exists to support the practice of viewing the deceased fetus by women terminating pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases searched (1966-2007) were Medline, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Dissertation Abstracts Index. STUDY SELECTION: Literature was reviewed that either directly or parenthetically dealt with the emotional effects on women of viewing the fetus post termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies. DATA EXTRACTION: No randomized or controlled trials were found.

Author(s): 
Sloan, Eileen P.
Kirsh, Sharon
Mowbray, Mary
Publication Title: 
Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology

Evidence-based practice and patient-centered practice are not mutually exclusive clinical ideals. Instead, both styles hold tremendous potential for complementarity in healthcare and should be used to enhance clinical relationships in which caring is humble, mindful, and nuanced. The onus of the responsibility for many decisions about care after stillbirth falls on clinical staff. Yet, even in the dearth of literature exploring standards of care during stillbirth the results can be conflicting.

Author(s): 
Cacciatore, Joanne
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

OBJECTIVE: This review describes the homeopathic analysis of grief and common remedies corresponding to this reaction. Homeopathic descriptions of grief are compared with contemporary psychiatric criteria. DATA SOURCES: Each homeopathic rubric (i.e., symptom) is identified on the basis of a computerized repertory search, grouped according to body systems, and compared with a current set of operational criteria derived from the psychiatric literature. The major homeopathic remedies for grief are identified.

Author(s): 
Davidson, J. R.
Gaylord, S.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry Research

There is considerable evidence that optimism, the predisposition to have generalized favorable expectancies for the future, is associated with numerous desirable outcomes. Few studies have examined the association of optimism with emotional distress following the death of a loved one. Doing so is important, because optimism may be an important target for interventions for post-loss psychopathology.

Author(s): 
Boelen, Paul A.
Publication Title: 
Family Process

Literature invites us to enter into the human dilemma in a manner that is different from but no less penetrating than clinical observation. The writer's craft uncovers realities other than the statistically measurable and objective. In languages far from the strictly literal and closer to indirection, symbolism, and aesthetics, the literary artist probes imagination and consciousness. He presents us with transcripts of conversations replete with intonations, and we thereby become privy to motivations and inner thoughts.

Author(s): 
Bertman, S. L.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

In this study of adults presenting with symptoms of pathological grief after the death of a parent, there was a frequent pattern of strain on a current love relationship. The attempt to master negative views of the self, precipitated by loss of the parent, through reenactment with the significant other was prominent. Psychotherapy offered an opportunity to rework the feared representation of the self.

Author(s): 
Kaltreider, N. B.
Becker, T.
Horowitz, M. J.
Publication Title: 
The Hillside Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

This paper suggests that separation and loss in early childhood may be less critical to later life than some people believe. Rather, internalization--after as well as before, age five--may be a developmental process to which psychotherapists need to pay particular attention. By attending to our patient's experiences of separation and loss, we allow them a metaphor, a language, with which they can describe the vicissitudes of lasting attachments.

Author(s): 
Vaillant, G. E.
Publication Title: 
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. Supplement

Looking back over the span of years surveyed, it appears that a sad experience, even many years ago, commonly leaves residual pain. This can be modified by sympathetic support enabling parents and baby to interact, although such interaction is not without painful as well as pleasurable effects. Coming to terms with loss may take longer than was previously thought. This study highlights the need for bereavement care, which aims to leave families with positive rather than negative feelings.

Author(s): 
Delight, E.
Goodall, J.
Publication Title: 
Adolescence

This paper identifies the conclusion of a romantic relationship as a significant loss for adolescents. The grief response initiated by this loss is frequently disenfranchised by adults and peers. Adolescent grief symptomatology as well as strategies for surviving a loss are outlined.

Author(s): 
Kaczmarek, M. G.
Backlund, B. A.
Publication Title: 
The American Psychologist

Psychological theories and practices frequently neglect the extent to which their subject matter is historically and culturally defined. This issue is explored in the context of theories and therapies related to bereavement. Contemporary orientations emphasize the importance of breaking bonds with the deceased and the return of survivors to autonomous lifestyles. Placing the orientation in cultural and historical context reveals that it is largely a product of a modernist worldview.

Author(s): 
Stroebe, M.
Gergen, M. M.
Gergen, K. J.
Stroebe, W.

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