Growth

Publication Title: 
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity

Seeds of Artocarpus hirsutus Lam., Garcinia xanthochymus Hook., Saraca asoca Roxb., Rourea minor Gaertn., Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb., Terminalia chebula Retz., Aporusa lindleyana (Wt.) bail., Holoptelea integrifolia Roxb. and Oroxylum indicum (L.) Vent. were collected from different regions of Western Ghats and exposed to different doses of gamma radiation using Co-60 source. The effect of irradiation was examined on germination, growth and vigor parameters.

Author(s): 
Akshatha, null
Chandrashekar, K. R.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Author(s): 
Roeder, L. M.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physical Anthropology

Eighty-two people dating from 1975 to 1879 compared with 182 modern middle-class White and Black skeletons test the myths of radical changes produced by improved diet, less disease, and nineteenth century immigration. Longevity increases and health and growth improvement is clearest in reduced juvenile deaths (census data) and deepening of true pelvis. Stature increase is minimal (though seventeenth century Londoners and modern West Africans are shorter than Colonial to Modern Americans); teeth deteriorate and for cultural reasons fractures increase. Clavicles and forearms elongate.

Author(s): 
Angel, J. L.
Publication Title: 
Annual Review of Nutrition
Author(s): 
Emken, E. A.
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

Human milk has the lowest concentration of protein of any mammalian species. Since the rate of growth of the offspring is negatively related to the protein content of the milk, the time required to double the birth weight is greater in the infant than in any other mammal in which it has been measured. Similarly, in weaned animals, a low protein diet increases the time required to reach maximal growth, senescence and natural death. Human milk protein has the highest whey protein to casein ratio than the milk of any other mammalian species.

Author(s): 
Bounous, G.
Kongshavn, P. A.
Taveroff, A.
Gold, P.
Publication Title: 
British Medical Bulletin

Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) occurs predominantly after the age of 50 years but is not easy to distinguish from late onset insulin-dependent diabetes. It is likely that misclassification is rare in a Caucasian population. Whilst NIDDM is widely believed to be genetically determined, recent epidemiological observations have consistently revealed statistical associations between indices of poor fetal and infant growth with susceptibility to loss of glucose tolerance in adult life.

Author(s): 
Hales, C. N.
Publication Title: 
Medical Hypotheses

Secular growth has been occurring in Europe for about 150 years. In the USA, since 1900, each new generation has increased by an average of 1in (2.54cm) in height and about 10lb (4.54kg) in weight. This trend has generally been viewed as favorable and tallness is admired, with the current ideal height for a man in the Western world being 6ft 2in (188cm). The Japanese have increased in height since the end of the Second World War by about 5in (12.7cm) in height and the Chinese have been growing at the rate of 2.54cm/decade since the 1950s.

Author(s): 
Samaras, T. T.
Storms, L. H.
Publication Title: 
NestlÈ Nutrition Workshop Series. Paediatric Programme

Effects of in utero and early life conditions on adult health and disease such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes are well documented by epidemiological and clinical observations. Animal models including intrauterine artery ligation, maternal restriction of iron, protein or general caloric intake, provide invaluable tools to understand mechanisms linking early growth and later diseases in adult life. In addition, the rodent model of maternal protein restriction has revealed that longevity can be influenced either positively or negatively by early growth patterns.

Author(s): 
Chen, J.-H.
Cottrell, E. C.
Ozanne, S. E.
Publication Title: 
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

Understanding the trade-offs between organisms' life history traits has been a major goal of physiology, ecology and evolution. In the last few decades, two types of intra-specific studies have highlighted the trade-off between growth and longevity. First, diet restriction (DR), as an environmental intervention, has been shown to suppress growth and extend the lifespan of a broad range of animals. Second, genetic studies have also shown that mice, whose growth hormone function is genetically modified (GM), grow slower and live longer than their wild-type siblings.

Author(s): 
Hou, Chen
Publication Title: 
Novartis Foundation Symposium

There is a strong genetic component for schizophrenia risk, but it is unclear how the illness is maintained in the population given the significantly reduced fertility of those with the disorder. One possibility is that new mutations occur in schizophrenia vulnerability genes. If so, then those with schizophrenia may have older fathers, since advancing paternal age is the major source of new mutations in humans. We found that paternal age at conception is a robust risk factor for schizophrenia, explaining perhaps a quarter of all cases.

Author(s): 
Malaspina, D.
Perrin, M.
Kleinhaus, K. R.
Opler, M.
Harlap, S.

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