H-Reflex

Publication Title: 
Electromyography and Clinical Neurophysiology

The purpose of this study was to compare the magnitude and duration of motoneuron inhibition occurring as a sequel to spinal manipulation or paraspinal and limb massage. The physiologic mechanisms involved in spinal manipulative therapy and massage therapy are largely unknown. One possible hypothesis is based upon the theory that these two distinct and different modalities may attenuate the activity of alpha motoneurons. Both modalities have been reported to produce short-term inhibition of motoneurons.

Author(s): 
Dishman, J. D.
Bulbulian, R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

Twenty-seven male and 12 female healthy volunteers were tested twice with 2-7 days separation. Hoffman (H) reflexes and muscle (M) activation waves were obtained from the posterior tibial nerves bilaterally. Results were compared to those obtained from patients presenting with a complaint of low back and/or leg pain, without compressive neuropathy. M, F, H latencies and H/Mmax ratio were recorded. H/M ratio and latency comparisons were not significantly different in the control group left to right or test to test.

Author(s): 
Humphreys, C. R.
Triano, J. J.
Brandl, M. J.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

OBJECTIVE: Determine the electrophysiological effects of anterior knee pain using monosynaptic and polysynaptic reflexes. DESIGN: A pretest/posttest control group experimental design with repeated measures. SETTING: All tests were performed in a university laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Six subjects suffering from patello-femoral dysfunction (PFD) composed the experimental group. These patients were diagnosed and referred by medical and chiropractic doctors. Six healthy subjects were recruited for the control group. INTERVENTION: Pain relief by cold application (10 minutes) on the knee.

Author(s): 
Leroux, A.
Bélanger, M.
Boucher, J. P.
Publication Title: 
European Spine Journal: Official Publication of the European Spine Society, the European Spinal Deformity Society, and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society

The aim of this clinical investigation was to determine whether the abnormal H-reflex complex present in patients with S1 nerve root compression due to lumbosacral disc herniation is improved by single-session lumbar manipulation. Twenty-four patients with unilateral disc herniation at the L5-S1 level underwent spinal H-reflex electro-physiological evaluation. This was carried out before and after single-session lumbar manipulation in the side-lying position.

Author(s): 
Floman, Y.
Liram, N.
Gilai, A. N.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: To measure the effects of manual segmental vibration (MSV) on motoneuron pool excitability. METHODS: Seven healthy subjects were tested under five conditions: pretest, upholding static knee position (USKP), MSV, posttest 1 and posttest 2. Each test lasted 2 min, and a 2-min rest was given between pretest, USKP and MSV, whereas the last two tests were consecutive. Cutaneous pressure and vibration frequency were stabilized through training periods. The effects of MSV on motoneuron excitability were investigated by measuring the H-reflex peak-to-peak amplitude.

Author(s): 
Hébert, J.
Boucher, J. P.
Publication Title: 
Electromyography and Clinical Neurophysiology

The purpose of this study was to compare the magnitude and duration of motoneuron inhibition occurring as a sequel to spinal manipulation or paraspinal and limb massage. The physiologic mechanisms involved in spinal manipulative therapy and massage therapy are largely unknown. One possible hypothesis is based upon the theory that these two distinct and different modalities may attenuate the activity of alpha motoneurons. Both modalities have been reported to produce short-term inhibition of motoneurons.

Author(s): 
Dishman, J. D.
Bulbulian, R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: Metabolic and thermal stresses of exercise mediate the release of endogenous opioids depressing motoneuron activation (MNA). Although exercise is routinely presented as a coequal treatment for management of acute and chronic low back pain (LBP), it is not clear that exercise-induced endogenous opioid release can play a role in the analgesic and treatment outcomes for patients with LBP. Furthermore, if opioid involvement is present, it is not clear what level of exercise might be beneficial in the suppression of MNA and possibly LBP.

Author(s): 
Bulbulian, Ronald
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: Previous investigations indicate that spinal manipulation leads to short-term attenuation of alpha-motoneuron excitability, when assessed by means of the Hoffmann reflex. Past studies, however, are limited to regional effects, such as lumbar manipulation effects on lumbar alpha-motoneuron activity.

Author(s): 
Dishman, J. Donald
Cunningham, Brian M.
Burke, Jeanmarie
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: Flexion distraction has gained increased credibility as a therapeutic modality for treatment of low back pain. Although important work in the area has elucidated the intradiskal pressure profiles during flexion distraction, the accompanying neural responses have yet to be described. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this pilot study was to assess neural reflex responses to motion with 3 degrees of freedom applied to the lumbar spine and to evaluate H-reflex responses of the soleus.

Author(s): 
Bulbulian, Ronald
Burke, Jeanmarie
Dishman, J. Donald
Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Spinal manipulation (SM) is a commonly employed nonoperative treatment modality in the management of patients with neck, low back or pelvic pain. One basic physiologic response to SM is a transient decrease in motoneuron activity as assessed using the Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) technique. Previous research from our laboratory indicates that both SM with a high-velocity, low-amplitude thrust and mobilization without thrust produced a profound but transient attenuation of motoneuronal activity of the lumbosacral spine in asymptomatic subjects.

Author(s): 
Dishman, J. Donald
Burke, Jeanmarie

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