Health Benefit Plans, Employee

Publication Title: 
West's California Reporter
Author(s): 
California. Court of Appeal, Third District
Publication Title: 
West's Pacific Reporter
Author(s): 
California. Supreme Court
Publication Title: 
The Rand Journal of Economics

This article identifies the impact of managed-care reforms on the utilization of medical services within the military health-services system. The data come from a recent demonstration project that substituted an HMO and PPO for traditional FFS arrangements. Results from a semiparametric model indicate that the generosity of benefits in the HMO increased demand for ambulatory services. Unlike the private-sector experience with managed care, aggressive utilization review did not significantly curtail inpatient stays.

Author(s): 
Goldman, D. P.
Publication Title: 
The Gerontologist

Using data from the 1990 Health Supplement to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we examine the determinants of patterns of insurance coverage among the elderly. Among those with supplemental insurance through an employment-based source, the primary determinant of having insurance is work history, specifically job tenure and occupation of household heads and their spouses. Among those who do not have employer-provided insurance, wealth is the most important economic factor in the purchase of private insurance.

Author(s): 
Lillard, L.
Rogowski, J.
Kington, R.
Publication Title: 
Health Economics

This paper uses data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey to examine the nature of equilibrium in the market for employment-related health insurance. We examine coverage generosity, premiums, and insurance benefits net of expenditures on premiums, showing that despite a degree of market segmentation, there was a substantial amount of pooling of heterogeneous risks in 1987 among households with employment-related coverage. Our results are largely invariant to (i) firm size and (ii) whether or not employers offer a choice among plans.

Author(s): 
Monheit, A. C.
Selden, T. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Dental Education

Dentists and the dental team have been encouraged to become an important part of the effort to curb tobacco use. Many health insurance policies, however, do not cover tobacco cessation programs, especially by dentists. The generosity of insurance for tobacco cessation has been found to influence the use of these programs.

Author(s): 
Damiano, P. C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Economics

Although most private health insurance in US is employment-based, little is known about how employers choose health plans for their employees. In this paper, I examine the relationship between employee preferences for health insurance and the health plans offered by employers. I find evidence that employee characteristics affect the generosity of the health plans offered by employers and the likelihood that employers offer a choice of plans.

Author(s): 
Bundorf, M. Kate
Publication Title: 
Medical care research and review: MCRR

The authors examine the generosity of private employer health insurance coverage using data from two large national surveys of employers. Generosity is measured as the expected out-of-pocket share of medical expenditures for a standard population, given the provisions of the coverage. On average, those covered by employer-sponsored insurance can expect to pay 25 percent of expenditures out of pocket. There is little variability across plans in this share, though plans offered by smaller employers are somewhat less generous than those offered by larger employers.

Author(s): 
Gabel, Jon R.
Long, Stephen H.
Marquis, M. Susan
Publication Title: 
Inquiry: A Journal of Medical Care Organization, Provision and Financing

Concerns about attracting disproportionate numbers of employees with alcohol problems limit employers' willingness to offer health plans with generous alcohol treatment benefits. This paper analyzes two potential avenues of adverse selection, namely biased enrollment into plans and biased exit from plans offered by 57 employers between 1991 and 1997.

Author(s): 
Harris, Katherine M.
Sturm, Roland
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics

This paper addresses two seeming paradoxes in the realm of employer-provided health insurance: First, businesses consistently claim that they bear the burden of the insurance they provide for employees, despite theory and empirical evidence indicating that workers bear the full incidence. Second, benefit generosity and the percentage of premiums paid by employers have decreased in recent decades, despite the preferential tax treatment of employer-paid benefits relative to wages-trends unexplained by the standard incidence model.

Author(s): 
Sommers, Benjamin D.

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