Health Education

Publication Title: 
Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study assessed public awareness of warning symptoms, risk factors, and treatment of stroke in Ludhiana, Punjab, North West India. METHODS: A hospital-based survey was conducted between February 2002 and September 2002 by the Stroke section of Christian Medical College. The study subjects were relatives of patients without history of stroke, attending the outpatient department of the hospital. Trained medical students, interns, and a nurse interviewed subjects using a structured, pretested, open-ended questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Pandian, Jeyaraj D.
Jaison, Ashish
Deepak, Sukhbinder S.
Kalra, Guneet
Shamsher, Shivali
Lincoln, Douglas J.
Abraham, George
Publication Title: 
Sexual Health

BACKGROUND: The present study assessed the effectiveness of a brief narrative intervention implemented by trained biomedical and Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha, Homeopathy (AYUSH) providers from three low-income communities in Mumbai, India.

Author(s): 
Saggurti, Niranjan
Schensul, Stephen L.
Nastasi, Bonnie Kaul
Singh, Rajendra
Burleson, Joseph A.
Verma, Ravi K.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Previously it was shown that a brief yoga-based lifestyle intervention was efficacious in reducing oxidative stress and risk of chronic diseases even in a short duration. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of this intervention in reducing stress and inflammation in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases. DESIGN: This study reports preliminary results from a nonrandomized prospective ongoing study with pre-post design.

Author(s): 
Yadav, Raj Kumar
Magan, Dipti
Mehta, Nalin
Sharma, Ratna
Mahapatra, Sushil Chandra
Publication Title: 
Acta Tropica

This study assessed impact of community based self care integrative treatment provided through mass camps in villages of three districts of Kerala, India endemic for lymphatic filariasis (LF). Two most endemic Primary Health centres (PHCs) were selected from each of the three districts, where maximum concentration of LF patients is recorded. Fourteen one day LF camps, each attended by 30-40 patients were conducted. Trained Accredited Social Health Activists encouraged LF patients to attend camps.

Author(s): 
Aggithaya, Madhur Guruprasad
Narahari, Saravu R.
Vayalil, Sudha
Shefuvan, Mohammed
Jacob, Neethu K.
Sushma, Kandathu Valappil
Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills

This study was designed to examine the effects of exercise on indices of emotional well-being of 584 college students enrolled in either a lecture-only health course or one of six health-fitness courses, each using a different mode of exercise including cross-training, aerobics, yoga, circuit weight training, swimming, and walk/jog. Each participant completed the Self-perception Profile for College Students developed by Neeman and Harter.

Author(s): 
Muller, Susan M.
Dennis, Dixie L.
Gorrow, Teena
Publication Title: 
Nursing Research

This study examines whether traditional health beliefs and practices of black Americans reported in the literature were consistent with those of a target population of low-income black women in Los Angeles County and describes how these traditional classifications of illness and healing practices were related to their understanding of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A qualitative approach was used to gather the data in unstructured interviews. Content analysis was used to classify data.

Author(s): 
Flaskerud, J. H.
Rush, C. E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: The Journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Knowledge, awareness and perception of STDs among 983 adolescent female high school students at Onitsha, Nigeria is analysed. There was good general awareness of the common STDs, HIV/AIDS: 93.6% (n=920), gonorrhoea: 76.3% (n=750); syphilis: 69.1% (n=679), while the least was chlamydial disease: 6.6% (n=65). Knowledge of causes of STDs was high. Viruses were identified as the most common cause of STDs by 75.3% (n=740) of the respondents, followed by bacteria by 64.1% (n=630), while 17.8% (n=175) of the students believed that poison/witchcraft caused STDs.

Author(s): 
Obiechina, Nworah J. A.
Diwe, K.
Ikpeze, O. C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: The Journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Knowledge, awareness and perception of STDs among 983 adolescent female high school students at Onitsha, Nigeria is analysed. There was good general awareness of the common STDs, HIV/AIDS: 93.6% (n=920), gonorrhoea: 76.3% (n=750); syphilis: 69.1% (n=679), while the least was chlamydial disease: 6.6% (n=65). Knowledge of causes of STDs was high. Viruses were identified as the most common cause of STDs by 75.3% (n=740) of the respondents, followed by bacteria by 64.1% (n=630), while 17.8% (n=175) of the students believed that poison/witchcraft caused STDs.

Author(s): 
Obiechina, Nworah J. A.
Diwe, K.
Ikpeze, O. C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cancer Education: The Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to explore the use of storytelling as a method to teach breast health information to older African American women. METHODS: A qualitative design utilizing the focus-group method. RESULTS: Six story types (categories) emerged from the focus-group data and were integrated into the breast health education class. Categories were: 1) loss, 2) pain, 3) suffering, 4) fear and worry/stress, 5) death, and 6) faith in God and prayer.

Author(s): 
Williams-Brown, Shanita
Baldwin, Dee M.
Bakos, Alexis
Publication Title: 
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: The Journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Knowledge, awareness and perception of STDs among 983 adolescent female high school students at Onitsha, Nigeria is analysed. There was good general awareness of the common STDs, HIV/AIDS: 93.6% (n=920), gonorrhoea: 76.3% (n=750); syphilis: 69.1% (n=679), while the least was chlamydial disease: 6.6% (n=65). Knowledge of causes of STDs was high. Viruses were identified as the most common cause of STDs by 75.3% (n=740) of the respondents, followed by bacteria by 64.1% (n=630), while 17.8% (n=175) of the students believed that poison/witchcraft caused STDs.

Author(s): 
Obiechina, Nworah J. A.
Diwe, K.
Ikpeze, O. C.

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