Health Personnel

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) by yoga therapists (YTs). OBJECTIVE: To determine the attitudes, skills, training, use, barriers and facilitators to the use of EBP amongst North American YTs DESIGN: Cross-sectional, descriptive survey METHODS: Self-identified YTs practicing in North America were invited to participate in an online survey. YT attitudes, skills, training, utilisation, barriers to use, and facilitators of EBP use were measured using the 84-item Evidence-Based practice Attitude and utilization SurvEy (EBASE).

Author(s): 
Sullivan, Marlysa
Leach, Matthew
Snow, James
Moonaz, Steffany
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, little is known about whether CAM is offered in hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe to what extent CAM is offered in Norwegian and Danish hospitals and investigate possible changes in Norway since 2001. METHODS: A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. The questionnaire was sent to the person responsible for the clinical activity, typically the medical director.

Author(s): 
Salomonsen, Laila J.
Skovgaard, Lasse
la Cour, Søren
Nyborg, Lisbeth
Launsø, Laila
Fønnebø, Vinjar
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Background Healthcare workers can suffer from occupational stress as a result of lack of skills, organisational factors, and low social support at work.which may lead to distress, burnout and psychosomatic problems, and deterioration in quality of life and service provision.Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of work- and person-directed interventions compared to no intervention or alternative interventions in preventing stress at work in healthcare workers.Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL,NIOSHTI

Author(s): 
Ruotsalainen, Jani H.
Verbeek, Jos H.
Marine, Albert
Serra, Consol
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers can suffer from occupational stress as a result of lack of skills, organisational factors, and low social support at work. which may lead to distress, burnout and psychosomatic problems, and deterioration in quality of life and service provision. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of work- and person-directed interventions compared to no intervention or alternative interventions in preventing stress at work in healthcare workers.

Author(s): 
Ruotsalainen, Jani H.
Verbeek, Jos H.
Marine, Albert
Serra, Consol
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers can suffer from occupational stress as a result of lack of skills, organisational factors, and low social support at work. This may lead to distress, burnout and psychosomatic problems, and deterioration in quality of life and service provision. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of work- and person-directed interventions compared to no intervention or alternative interventions in preventing stress at work in healthcare workers.

Author(s): 
Ruotsalainen, Jani H.
Verbeek, Jos H.
Marine, Albert
Serra, Consol
Publication Title: 
Stress and Health: Journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress

Workplace stress is high among healthcare professionals (HCPs) and is associated with reduced psychological health, quality of care and patient satisfaction. This systematic review and meta-analysis reviews evidence on the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for reducing stress in HCPs. A systematic literature search was conducted. Papers were screened for suitability using inclusion criteria and nine papers were subjected to review and quality assessment. Seven papers, for which full statistical findings could be obtained, were also subjected to meta-analysis.

Author(s): 
Burton, Amy
Burgess, Catherine
Dean, Sarah
Koutsopoulou, Gina Z.
Hugh-Jones, Siobhan
Publication Title: 
Behavior Therapy

Previous evidence for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been derived principally from randomized controlled trials. As such, evidence about the treatment of OCD has unilaterally flowed from researchers to clinicians. Despite often having decades of experience treating OCD, clinicians' feedback on their clinical observations in using these treatments has not been solicited.

Author(s): 
Jacobson, Nicholas C.
Newman, Michelle G.
Goldfried, Marvin R.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Medicine

Mindfulness practice, where an individual maintains openness, patience, and acceptance while focusing attention on a situation in a nonjudgmental way, can improve symptoms of anxiety, burnout, and depression. The practice is relevant for health care providers; however, the time commitment is a barrier to practice. For this reason, brief mindfulness interventions (eg, ? 4 hours) are being introduced. We systematically reviewed the literature from inception to January 2017 about the effects of brief mindfulness interventions on provider well-being and behavior.

Author(s): 
Gilmartin, Heather
Goyal, Anupama
Hamati, Mary C.
Mann, Jason
Saint, Sanjay
Chopra, Vineet
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

Healthcare providers may experience a high level of stress, fatigue, and anxiety originating from different factors. Mind-body therapies, which include many interventions, have been proposed to alleviate these conditions. These interventions have been reported to decrease the level of stress, and the negative outcomes associated with these factors: high burnout rate, and poor quality of care for patients.

Author(s): 
Mensah, Sylvanus Brenya
Anderson, Joel G.
Publication Title: 
Holistic Nursing Practice

The impact of spiritual practices on job satisfaction remains unclear. This integrative literature review assessed the effectiveness of various spiritual interventions and found that mindfulness was the intervention most widely used. The most promising outcome measures were stress, burnout, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Future research recommendation includes longitudinal reinforcement of mindfulness.

Author(s): 
Koren, Mary Elaine
Purohit, Sonal

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