Health Status

Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Many Americans use religious activity to cope with stressful life events. Our goal was to review systematically the recent medical literature to assess the role of religion in health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE to identify studies published in the English language between January 1999 and June 2003 describing the effect of religion on health outcomes.

Author(s): 
Coruh, Ba?ak
Ayele, Hana
Pugh, Meredith
Mulligan, Thomas
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among adults scheduled to, or actively undergoing, cancer treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched through November 2011. In addition, the authors searched PubMed's related article feature, trial registries, and reference lists of included trials and related reviews. DATA SYNTHESIS: 56 trials with 4,826 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Cancer survivors experience numerous disease and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures for cancer survivorship. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL and HRQoL domains among adult post-treatment cancer survivors.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Geigle, Paula M.
Berlanstein, Debra R.
Topaloglu, Ozlem
Gotay, Carolyn C.
Snyder, Claire
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: People with cancer undergoing active treatment experience numerous disease- and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures of cancer survivorship, both during and after the end of active treatment for cancer. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL outcomes and specific HRQoL domains among adults with cancer during active treatment.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula M.
Berlanstein, Debra R.
Topaloglu, Ozlem
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among cancer survivors who have completed primary treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched from inception (dates varied) to October 2011. The authors also identified eligible trials through a search of additional sources. DATA SYNTHESIS: 40 trials with 3,694 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Haematological malignancies are malignant neoplasms of the myeloid or lymphatic cell lines including leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma. In order to manage physical and psychological aspects of the disease and its treatment, complementary therapies like yoga are coming increasingly into focus. However, the effectiveness of yoga practice for people suffering from haematological malignancies remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of yoga practice in addition to standard cancer treatment for people with haematological malignancies.

Author(s): 
Felbel, Steffen
Meerpohl, Joerg J.
Monsef, Ina
Engert, Andreas
Skoetz, Nicole
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

BACKGROUND: Yoga, a popular mind-body practice, may produce changes in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic syndrome risk factors. DESIGN: This was a systematic review and random-effects meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were performed for systematic reviews and RCTs through December 2013. Studies were included if they were English, peer-reviewed, focused on asana-based yoga in adults, and reported relevant outcomes.

Author(s): 
Chu, Paula
Gotink, Rinske A.
Yeh, Gloria Y.
Goldie, Sue J.
Hunink, M. G. Myriam
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

OBJECTIVE: This article reports a systematic review and critical appraisal of the effect of yoga on stress management in healthy adults. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trials (CCTs) that assessed the effects of yoga on stress management in healthy adults. Selected studies were classified according to the types of intervention, duration, outcome measures, and results. They were also qualitatively assessed based on Public Health Research, Education and Development standards.

Author(s): 
Chong, Cecilia S. M.
Tsunaka, Megumi
Tsang, Hector W. H.
Chan, Edward P.
Cheung, Wai Ming
Publication Title: 
Preventive Medicine

INTRODUCTION: Overweight and obesity are among the most important modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases and premature death. The aim of this review was to systematically assess and analyze the effects of yoga on weight-related outcomes. METHODS: Medline/PubMed, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were screened through March 2015 for randomized controlled trials on yoga for weight-related outcomes in the general population or overweight/obese individuals.

Author(s): 
Lauche, Romy
Langhorst, Jost
Lee, Myeong Soo
Dobos, Gustav
Cramer, Holger
Publication Title: 
BMC cancer

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to systematically review the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to conduct a meta-analysis of the effects of yoga on physical and psychosocial outcomes in cancer patients and survivors. METHODS: A systematic literature search in ten databases was conducted in November 2011. Studies were included if they had an RCT design, focused on cancer patients or survivors, included physical postures in the yoga program, compared yoga with a non-exercise or waitlist control group, and evaluated physical and/or psychosocial outcomes.

Author(s): 
Buffart, Laurien M.
van Uffelen, Jannique G. Z.
Riphagen, Ingrid I.
Brug, Johannes
van Mechelen, Willem
Brown, Wendy J.
Chinapaw, Mai J. M.

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