Helping Behavior

Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

The current review aims to unify existing views of altruism through an examination of the biological bases of a fundamental form of giving: altruistic responding. Altruistic responding is most salient during heroic acts of helping but is also observed any time one perceives another's distress or need, which in turn motivates one to help at a current cost to the self. Such aid is simple, observable across species, and rooted in the instincts and circuits that evolved to maximize inclusive fitness through the care of helpless offspring.

Author(s): 
Preston, Stephanie D.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

It is unclear why some people behave altruistically and others do not. This study seeks to determine what psychological features could help predict altruistic behavior. We addressed the issue by examining distinct dimensions of temperament and emotional intelligence and their associations with the level of proaltruistic aptitude in two distant age-groups, young (20-29 years) and senior (60-79 years) persons. The study was one of a self-reported psychometric survey.

Author(s): 
Pokorski, Mieczyslaw
Faron-Lasyk, Aneta
Borecki, Lukasz
Publication Title: 
Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

Contingent reciprocity is important in theories of the evolution of human cooperation, but it has been very little studied in ontogeny. We gave 2- and 3-year-old children the opportunity to either help or share with a partner after that partner either had or had not previously helped or shared with the children. Previous helping did not influence children's helping. In contrast, previous sharing by the partner led to greater sharing in 3-year-olds but not in 2-year-olds.

Author(s): 
Warneken, Felix
Tomasello, Michael
Publication Title: 
Proceedings. Biological Sciences

Helping, i.e. behaviour increasing the fitness of others, can evolve when directed towards kin or reciprocating partners. These predictions have been tested in the context of food sharing both in human foragers and non-human primates. Here, we performed quantitative meta-analyses on 32 independent study populations to (i) test for overall effects of reciprocity on food sharing while controlling for alternative explanations, methodological biases, publication bias and phylogeny and (ii) compare the relative effects of reciprocity, kinship and tolerated scrounging, i.e.

Author(s): 
Jaeggi, Adrian V.
Gurven, Michael
Publication Title: 
BMC evolutionary biology

BACKGROUND: Despite its short-term costs, behaviour that appears altruistic can increase an individual's inclusive fitness by earning direct (selfish) and/or indirect (kin-selected) benefits. An evolved preference for other-regarding or helping behaviour in potential mates has been proposed as an additional mechanism by which these behaviours can yield direct fitness benefits in humans. RESULTS: We asked 32 heterosexual women and 35 heterosexual men to rate the attractiveness of members of the opposite sex in the presence and the absence of information about helping behaviours.

Author(s): 
Moore, David
Wigby, Stuart
English, Sinead
Wong, Sonny
SzÈkely, Tam·s
Harrison, Freya
Publication Title: 
Journal of Experimental Psychology. General

Psychological theories of human altruism suggest that helping results from an evolved tendency in caregiving mammals to respond to distress or need with empathy and sympathy. However, theories from biology, economics, and social psychology demonstrate that social animals also evolved to affiliate with and help desirable social partners. These models make different predictions about the affect of those we should prefer to help.

Author(s): 
Hauser, David J.
Preston, Stephanie D.
Stansfield, R. Brent
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Social Psychology

This experimental vignette study examined children's perceptions and evaluations of helping a peer, in the context of friendships and in the presence of by-standing peers. A total of 1246 children (8 to 12 years) reported their attitude toward helping when either friends of the helper, friends of the recipient of help, or no bystanders were present. In agreement with the competitive altruism model, children most strongly endorsed helping when friends of the helper were present compared to the other two situations.

Author(s): 
Sierksma, Jellie
Thijs, Jochem
Verkuyten, Maykel
Publication Title: 
Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet

BACKGROUND: Volunteerism in health through cadres of village health volunteers (VHV) has been common since the "health for all" campaign. At present, with political support, the VHV receives monthly financial support, and this creates a conflict of interest and competition among the VHV groups. Therefore, a tool to identify the VHV who has natural helper characteristics, a voluntary mind set and a readiness to help is needed. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to develop and test the quality of the natural helper characteristic scale (NHCS).

Author(s): 
Neelapaichit, Nareemarn
Tanasugarn, Chanuantong
Wattanasomboon, Paranee
Chansatitporn, Natkamol
Publication Title: 
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences

BACKGROUND: Several factors including emotional intelligence affect the efficiency of people. It seems that organizational behavior of each person is strongly influenced by emotional intelligence. Therefore, the present study is aimed to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and organizational citizenship behavior in critical and emergency nurses in teaching hospitals supervised by Kerman Medical University in Southeast of Iran. METHODS: This study employed a descriptive cross sectional design.

Author(s): 
Tofighi, M.
Tirgari, B.
Fooladvandi, M.
Rasouli, F.
Jalali, M.
Publication Title: 
Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences

There is clearly a plurality of forms of altruism. Classically, biological altruism is distinguished from psychological altruism. Recent discussions of altruism have attempted to distinguish even more forms of altruism. I will focus on three altruism concepts, biological altruism, psychological altruism, and helping altruism. The questions I am concerned with here are, first, how should we understand these concepts? and second, what relationship do these concepts bear to one another? In particular, is there an essence to altruism that unifies these concepts?

Author(s): 
Ramsey, Grant

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