Hinduism

Publication Title: 
Brain and Cognition

The most diffuse forms of meditation derive from Hinduism and Buddhism spiritual traditions. Different cognitive processes are set in place to reach these meditation states. According to an historical-philological hypothesis (Wynne, 2009) the two forms of meditation could be disentangled.

Author(s): 
Tomasino, Barbara
Chiesa, Alberto
Fabbro, Franco
Publication Title: 
Brain and Cognition

The most diffuse forms of meditation derive from Hinduism and Buddhism spiritual traditions. Different cognitive processes are set in place to reach these meditation states. According to an historical-philological hypothesis (Wynne, 2009) the two forms of meditation could be disentangled.

Author(s): 
Tomasino, Barbara
Chiesa, Alberto
Fabbro, Franco
Publication Title: 
Journal of Studies on Alcohol

OBJECTIVE: The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), a commonly used instrument of alcohol-related problems, was examined to determine whether it assessed the same constructs in individuals from religions with different proscriptions regarding the use of alcohol. METHOD: The MAST was completed by participants in the longitudinal Joint Child Health Project when they were approximately 23 years old. Subjects of this study (N= 747; 505 men) were 465 Hindus, 223 Catholics and 59 Muslims who reported drinking alcohol.

Author(s): 
Luczak, S. E.
Raine, A.
Venables, P. H.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Religion and Health

The use of psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology has been the focus of attention in the bioethics literature. However, there has been little examination of the challenges that this practice creates for religious traditions that place importance on questions of being, authenticity, and identity. We asked expert commentators from six major world religions to consider the issues raised by psychopharmaceuticals as an enhancement technology.

Author(s): 
Fitzpatrick, Scott J.
Jordens, Christopher F. C.
Kerridge, Ian H.
Keown, Damien
Walter, James J.
Nelson, Paul
Abdalla, Mohamad
Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani
Sarma, Deepak
Publication Title: 
Drug and Alcohol Dependence

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine religious factors associated with alcohol involvement in Mauritius. The three main religions on the island, Hinduism, Catholicism, and Islam, promote different views of the appropriate use of alcohol. Based on reference group theory, we hypothesized that both the content of a religion's alcohol norms and an individual's religious commitment would relate to alcohol use behavior.

Author(s): 
Luczak, Susan E.
Prescott, Carol A.
Dalais, Cyril
Raine, Adrian
Venables, Peter H.
Mednick, Sarnoff A.
Publication Title: 
The European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care: The Official Journal of the European Society of Contraception

Religion is embedded in the culture of all societies. It influences matters of morality, ideology and decision making, which concern every human being at some point in their life. Although the different religions often lack a united view on matters such contraception and abortion, there is sometimes some dogmatic overlap when general religious principles are subject to the influence of local customs. Immigration and population flow add further complexities to societal views on reproductive issues.

Author(s): 
Pinter, Bojana
Hakim, Marwan
Seidman, Daniel S.
Kubba, Ali
Kishen, Meera
Di Carlo, Costantino
Publication Title: 
SIECUS report
Author(s): 
Francoeur, R. T.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

A close study of ancient works of ayurveda and Kamasutra shows that the knowledge of anatomy and physiology of different parts of reproductive organs particularly of female genitals is lacking. Hymen, defloration and clitoris do not find any mention in earlier works. Works of medieval and late medieval period mention the different parts and their utility and function especially in the sexual enjoyment. Worship of vagina or Yonipuja was a common practice in some sects of Tantrists like Kaulas, Kapalikas and others.

Author(s): 
Rao, B. Rama
Publication Title: 
Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Author(s): 
Ravishankar, Sri Sri
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry

This paper discusses the hypothesis that the symptoms of functional psychoses can be caused by culturally structured spontaneous trances that may be reactions to environmental stress and psychological trauma. Findings are reviewed of anthropological studies of meditative trance experiences in Indian yogis characterized by divided consciousness (dissociation), religious auditory and visual hallucinations, and beliefs in their own spiritual powers.

Author(s): 
Castillo, Richard J.

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