Hispanic Americans

Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Dietetic Association

This article reviews the primary health problems of African-American, Hispanic-American, Asian/Pacific Islander-American, and Native-American elders. The goal is to familiarize practicing dietitians with the differences in longevity, disease spectrum, and functional status (where data are available) for each of these ethnic groups. These data should be of assistance in making decisions regarding dietary counseling for ethnic elders. It is acknowledged that most data accumulated according to race do not accurately measure ethnicity.

Author(s): 
Bernard, M. A.
Lampley-Dallas, V.
Smith, L.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Latino children are at increased risk for mirconutrient deficiencies and problems of overweight and obesity. Exposures in pregnancy and early postpartum may impact future growth trajectories. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationship between prenatal and postnatal maternal depressive symptoms experienced in pregnancy and infant growth from birth to 2 years of age in a cohort of Latino infants. METHODS: We recruited pregnant Latina mothers at two San Francisco hospitals and followed their healthy infants to 24 months of age.

Author(s): 
Wojcicki, Janet M.
Holbrook, Katherine
Lustig, Robert H.
Epel, Elissa
Caughey, Aaron B.
MuÒoz, Ricardo F.
Shiboski, Stephen C.
Heyman, Melvin B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved

The objective of this program was to increase mammography screening rates among Hispanic women through a series of targeted community-wide interventions. A diverse array of outreach efforts was offered by the program to increase awareness and use of screening mammography. Before the program, 12 percent of the Hispanic women surveyed in the intervention community had been screened, compared with 27 percent after the program. There was no change in screening among Hispanic women in the control community (23 percent before and 24 percent after the program).

Author(s): 
Fox, S. A.
Stein, J. A.
Gonzalez, R. E.
Farrenkopf, M.
Dellinger, A.
Publication Title: 
Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C.: 1974)

Community activists in Chicago believed their neighborhoods were being targeted by alcohol and tobacco outdoor advertisers, despite the Outdoor Advertising Association of America's voluntary code of principles, which claims to restrict the placement of ads for age-restricted products and prevent billboard saturation of urban neighborhoods. A research and action plan resulted from a 10-year collaborative partnership among Loyola University Chicago, the American Lung Association of Metropolitan Chicago (ALAMC), and community activists from a predominately African American church, St.

Author(s): 
Hackbarth, D. P.
Schnopp-Wyatt, D.
Katz, D.
Williams, J.
Silvestri, B.
Pfleger, M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology

Older, sedentary, urban-living, ethnic minority women are at high risk for preventable disease, but it is difficult to engage this population in health promotion efforts. This study tested two methods of engaging Hispanic and African American women, who were at high risk for cardiovascular disease, in a 10-week aerobic fitness program. The program was offered to 76 participants, in either a women's health clinic or a church. Attendance was the primary dependent variable and was recorded at each exercise session.

Author(s): 
Dornelas, Ellen A.
Stepnowski, Roxanne R.
Fischer, Edward H.
Thompson, Paul D.
Publication Title: 
Home Healthcare Nurse

This article examines the cultural influences of the Hispanic patient, such as health beliefs, communication styles, family and religious values, and time perception. In order to design and deliver individualized comprehensive care with the client and family, these assessment factors must be explored to create a plan of care that is tailored to meet the individualized needs of the patient and family.

Author(s): 
Knoerl, Ann Marie
Publication Title: 
The Diabetes Educator

PURPOSE: The purpose of this randomized controlled trial is to determine the effectiveness of an intervention led by promotoras (community lay workers) on the glycemic control, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes health beliefs of Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes living in a major city on the Texas-Mexico border. METHODS: One hundred fifty Mexican American participants were recruited at a Catholic faith-based clinic and randomized into 2 groups. Personal characteristics, acculturation, baseline A1C level, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes health beliefs were measured.

Author(s): 
Lujan, Josefina
Ostwald, Sharon K.
Ortiz, Melchor
Publication Title: 
Preventing Chronic Disease

INTRODUCTION: Obesity has reached epidemic levels, with nearly two-thirds of the U.S. population considered overweight or obese. Latinos have some of the highest rates of overweight, obesity, and sedentary lifestyle. Research from scientifically sound evidence-based interventions to reduce the disproportionate burden of obesity and its associated morbidity and mortality among Latinas is greatly needed.

Author(s): 
Ramirez, Amelie G.
Chalela, Patricia
Gallion, Kipling
Velez, Luis F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved

Although most U.S. Latinos identify as Catholic, few studies have focused on the influence of this religious tradition on health beliefs among this population. This study explores the role of Catholic religious teachings, practices, and ministry on cancer screening knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Latinos. Eight focus groups were conducted with 67 Catholic Latino parishioners in Massachusetts. Qualitative analysis provided evidence of strong reliance on faith, God, and parish leaders for health concerns.

Author(s): 
Allen, Jennifer D.
Leyva, Bryan
Torres, A. Idal
Ospino, Hosffman
Tom, Laura
Rustan, Sarah
Bartholomew, Amanda
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Health Behavior

OBJECTIVES: To assess cancer perceptions among churchgoers and to examine the potential influence of fatalism and religious beliefs on the use of cancer screening tests. METHODS: Eight semi-structured focus groups were conducted among 67 Hispanic Catholics in Massachusetts. RESULTS: In this sample, there were few references to fatalistic beliefs about cancer and nearly universal endorsement of the utility of cancer screening for cancer early detection. Most participants reported that their religious beliefs encouraged them to use health services, including cancer-screening tests.

Author(s): 
Leyva, Bryan
Allen, Jennifer D.
Tom, Laura S.
Ospino, Hosffman
Torres, Maria Idali
Abraído-Lanza, Ana F.

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