History of Medicine

Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

Conventional sciences have brought forth a wealth of knowledge and benefits, but they have not always been clear and precise about their legitimate scope and methodological limitations. In contrast, new and critical approaches in modern sciences question and reflect their own presuppositions, dependencies, and constraints. Examples are quantum physics, theory and history of science, as well as theory and history of medicine, sociology, and economics.

Author(s): 
Schmidt, Josef M.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Physical Anthropology

Eighty-two people dating from 1975 to 1879 compared with 182 modern middle-class White and Black skeletons test the myths of radical changes produced by improved diet, less disease, and nineteenth century immigration. Longevity increases and health and growth improvement is clearest in reduced juvenile deaths (census data) and deepening of true pelvis. Stature increase is minimal (though seventeenth century Londoners and modern West Africans are shorter than Colonial to Modern Americans); teeth deteriorate and for cultural reasons fractures increase. Clavicles and forearms elongate.

Author(s): 
Angel, J. L.
Publication Title: 
Orvostorteneti Kozlemenyek

Author attempted to collect all available medical data of the period of the reign of Mathias Corvinus (1443-1490) who ruled Hungary for 32 years. First part of this article outlines the general medical history of this era. In the 15th century the flourishing Kingdom of Hungary was inhabited by 3-3.2 million people. Under the rule of King Matthias epidemies were frequent visitors, plague e.g. was registered 11 times, while sudor anglicus once (in 1485). The ca. 120 hospitals of the era were founded mostly in towns and market-towns.

Author(s): 
Varjassy, PÈter
Publication Title: 
Gastroenterologia Y Hepatologia

Correspondence is an important source of documentation for studying health and, therefore, the gastrointestinal symptoms of diseases. We studied the gastrointestinal disease described in the Monumenta Borgia collection, which contains documents from the 16th century, mainly letters about Francis Borgia, the last great figure of a family originally from Valencia and with universal significance.

Author(s): 
Devesa Jord‡, Francesc
Publication Title: 
Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

Drawing on a large cache of letters to John and Frances Gunther after the death of their son as well as memoirs and fiction by bereaved parents, this essay challenges the assumptions of secularization that infuse histories of twentieth-century American medicine. Many parents who experienced the death of children during the postwar period relied heavily on religion to help make sense of the tragedies medicine could not prevent.

Author(s): 
Golden, Janet
Abel, Emily K.
Publication Title: 
La Presse Médicale
Author(s): 
Chertok, L.
Publication Title: 
Piel?gniarka I Po?ozna
Author(s): 
Zakrzewski, K.
Publication Title: 
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly

A major concern of nineteenth century scientists was to delineate the objective units or entities with which science deals. While some philosophers of science abandoned the search as futile and tried to redefine science, investigators in the biological sciences and the sciences of man attempted to discover new entities upon which to base their disciplines. A new understanding of hypnotism gave Freud the opportunity to isolate objective entities within the mind and to found a psychology on that basis.

Author(s): 
Friedman, L.
Publication Title: 
Victorian Periodicals Review
Author(s): 
Leighton, M. E.
Publication Title: 
Acta medico-historica adriatica: AMHA

Modern hypnosis started with the Austrian physician Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815), who believed that the phenomenon known as mesmerism, or animal magnetism, or fluidum was related to an invisible substance--a fluid that runs within the subject or between the subject and the therapist, that is, the hypnotist, or the "magnetizer". The term hypnosis was introduced in the 1840s by a Scottish surgeon James Braid (1795-1860), who believed the subject to be in a particular state of sleep--a trance.

Author(s): 
Radovancevi?, Ljubomir

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