History, Medieval

Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

The original conception of Ayurveda in its entirety is essentially linked to Dhanwantari who is considered as God of Hindu Medicine. Dhanwantari is considered a mythical deity born with ambrosia in one hand and Ayurveda on the other at the end of the churning of milk ocean. He reincarnated himself in the Chandra dynasty. He was born to King Dhanwa, learnt Ayurveda from Bharadwaja. His great grandson Divodasa was also known as Dhanwantari, but was specialised only in surgical branch of Ayurveda. Sushruta, is said to have learnt the art of science of surgery from Divodasa Dhanwantara.

Author(s): 
Murthy, A. R.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

In the doctrines of Ayurveda the twak rogas are known by the general term Kushtha. Atharvaveda describes the twak roga in the name of Kilasa, palita, with the clinical picture of grey and white spots, generally from deeper layers of skin and referred the herbal remedies. Almost all the samhitas uniformly classified Kushtha as Maha Kushtha and Kshudra Kushtha, but there is difference of opinion about the number in each group. The historical perspectives of the Twak rogas (Kushtha) are being presented according to Rigveda, Atharvaveda, Charaka, Sushruta, Vagbhata, Madhavakara Todaramalla.

Author(s): 
Narayana, A.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

Arunadatta who wrote the famous 'Sarvanga Sundara' commentary on Ashtanga Hridaya, was the son of Mrigankadatta and a multi-farious scholar having vast knowledge of several branches of ancient learnings. It is said that he was a native of Bengal and lived in the early period of 13th century, earlier to Hemadri. It is also believed that apart from the Sarvanga Sundara commentary, he wrote a commentary on Sushruta Samahita also and composed another work entitled 'Manushyala Chandrika' dealing and geology and architecture.

Author(s): 
Subhakta, P. K.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

It seems the survey for medical manuscripts has not been done thoroughly so far in India particularly in Andhra Pradesh. Though few Researchers toured many important places and collected a number of manuscripts, but still there are many villages and several families of physicians and scholars possessing many manuscripts, are not covered. One of the aims and objects of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine is to procure and study the rare and uncared medical manuscripts.

Author(s): 
Narayana, A.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

Vicharchika which is one of the common skin diseases, is most prevalent among masses whether rural or urban. A critical peep with regard to this into the various Ayurvedic Classics reveals that, the various kushtha rogas (including Vicharchika) were known to ancients of remote antiquity. Though all Ayurvedic classics have described eighteen varieties of Kushthas dividing into the two main groups viv. Mahakushthas and Kshudra Kushthas, but they differ in nomenclature, order, description, doshas involved and prognosis etc.

Author(s): 
Kumaraswamy, R.
Subhakta, P. K.
Publication Title: 
Sudhoffs Archiv

The present paper summarizes our recent investigations of the so-called horse books from the High Himalayas in Nepal. These books are written in tibetan language and are essentially dealing with hippology and hippiatry and to a lesser extent with topics such as pharmacology, anatomy, methods of diagnosis, divination and magical practices for horse races. The therapeutic methods of treatment in tibetan veterinary medicine are guided by the concepts of human medicine which, on the one hand, are related to the Ayurvedic System, on other hand, to the Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Author(s): 
Maurer, P.
von den Driesch, A.
Publication Title: 
Zhonghua Yi Shi Za Zhi (Beijing, China: 1980)

Jīvaka was very important in the history of Indian Buddhist medicine, and Indian āyurvedic classics yet ascribed some recipes to him. Jīvaka's four recipes from Nāvanītaka, Carkadatta, and Bodhisattva - garbhastha - sūtra etc. were handed down, reflecting his medical achievements.

Author(s): 
Chen, M.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

This is a comprehensive review of menace of free radicals and its concept and management in Ayurveda. This article highlights the various exogenous and endogenous factors responsible for the production of free radicals with special reference to the formation of unriped and purified metabolites (ama) during the metabolic activities at different levels of digestion. The purpose of this paper is to review the management of free radicals which can be designed with reference to diet and digestion biorhythms, behaviour, emotions and sense.

Author(s): 
Kumar, N.
Kumar, A.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

According to Ayurveda the word 'Pandu' denotes pale or yellowish white colour. Panduroga (anaemia) is a disease in which man becomes pallor due to deficiency of Rakta dhatu (blood) in the body. Rakta dhatu is mentioned among the Saptadhatus of the body. Historical importance of Panduroga and the comparative study regarding its Nidana-Samprapti, Lakshanas, Upadravas and Chikitsa etc. as found in Athavaveda, Mahabharata, Charaka Samhita, Sushruta Samhita, Chakradatta and Basava Rajeeyam etc. are being presented in this paper.

Author(s): 
Prasad, P. V.
Publication Title: 
Bulletin of the Indian Institute of History of Medicine (Hyderabad)

The three texts written by Charak, Sushrut and Vagbhat are considered as Vrihattrayee because of their original contributions to the basic tenants of Ayurveda and innovative uses of plants and medicine. But despite the possibility of exploring efficacious for mulations from among these classics, not much attempts have been made in this direction, due to the fact that now most of them are not in vogue in practice by majority of Ayurvedic physicians.

Author(s): 
Nanda, G. C.
Padhi, M. M.
Pathak, N. N.
Choppra, K. K.

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