Holistic Health

Publication Title: 
Nursing Administration Quarterly

Human caring, while instinctive, can also be taught, learned, and measured through the nursing education system. For decades information has been obtained that suggests people enter nursing because they value interpersonal relationships, altruism, and a desire to help others. Building on this "caring ethic," nursing students can be professionally trained so that the very best in nursing comes through in their practice. By using nursing theory, students realize their potential while gaining all requisite skills and competencies of today's practicing nurse.

Author(s): 
Woodward, Wendy
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Nursing

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aims to understand the effects of culturally enriched body-mind-spirit group therapy on anxiety, depression and holistic well-being among women with breast cancer and to examine patients' views on what aspects of group therapy worked to enhance their health. DESIGN: The study was designed using multiple methods, which consisted of a randomised controlled trial and a focus group interview. METHODS: A total of 16 subjects in the control group received the standard care of a physician's treatment at the outpatient department.

Author(s): 
Liu, Chun-Ju
Hsiung, Ping-Chuan
Chang, King-Jen
Liu, Yu-Fen
Wang, Kuo-Chang
Hsiao, Fei-Hsiu
Ng, Siu-man
Chan, Cecilia L. W.
Publication Title: 
Medical Anthropology

The search for a synthesis bridging the gap between materialist and idealist approaches in anthropological theory has been invigorated by recent efforts to develop a critical medical anthropology. Not limited to integrating class analysis and cultural interpretation, the "mindful body" paradigm also aims at empowering the ill, whose experience is denied by biomedical and psychiatric categories that locate disease either in the body or in the mind, and treat them separately from one another and independently of social context.

Author(s): 
DiGiacomo, S. M.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy

This paper discusses attempts to define health within a public policy arena and practical and conceptual difficulties that arise. An Australian Aboriginal definition of health is examined. Although there are certain difficulties of translation, this definition is prominent in current Australian health policy and discourse about health. The definition can be seen as broadly holistic in comparison to other holistic definitions such as that of the World Health Organization. The nature of this holism and its grounding within the context of Aboriginal Australia is discussed.

Author(s): 
Boddington, Paula
Räisänen, Ulla
Publication Title: 
The Nursing Clinics of North America

The milieu of the critical care unit is stressful for both the patient and health care professionals. As such, it has the potential to increase pain perception in patients, and decrease the nurse's awareness of pain relief needs of the patient. Several physical and pharmacologic methods of pain relief were discussed in this article. Nontechnologic analgesia such as hypnosis and relaxation were introduced as adjuncts or alternatives to more familiar methods of pain relief.

Author(s): 
Harrison, M.
Cotanch, P. H.
Publication Title: 
Holistic Nursing Practice
Author(s): 
Zahourek, R. P.
Publication Title: 
The Health Care Supervisor

In summary, consumers desire health care professionals with interpersonal communication skills; with ability to interpret nonverbal communication or body language beyond gross facial gestures; and with effective questioning techniques for taking family histories quickly and accurately yet uncovering some client feelings and life-style difficulties in the process.

Author(s): 
Yura-Petro, H.
Scanelli, B. R.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

Western or conventional medical practices are founded on the principle of Newtonian physics; the body is viewed as a large clock whose broken parts are fixed or replaced.

Author(s): 
Seaward, B. L.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice / American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Patients with sickle cell disease cope with their disease in various ways, such as psychological counseling, hypnosis, medication, and prayer. Spirituality is a coping mechanism in a variety of diseases. This study evaluates the role of spirituality in patients coping with the pain of sickle cell disease. METHODS: Seventy-one patients from the Georgia Sickle Cell Clinic completed a questionnaire addressing their ability to cope with the pain of sickle cell disease and their degree of spirituality. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used.

Author(s): 
Cooper-Effa, M.
Blount, W.
Kaslow, N.
Rothenberg, R.
Eckman, J.
Publication Title: 
The Australian Journal of Holistic Nursing

Unlike the biomedical model, holistic health care takes a much broader view of what constitutes health and the responsibility for helping restore an individual's health. Homoeopathy addresses the physical, mental and emotional aspects of the whole individual, while alternative practices such as yoga, hypnotherapy and meditation can be described as 'functional' spiritual practices which demonstrate the taking of personal responsibility for health care to the individual.

Author(s): 
Bell, F.

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