Horse Diseases

Publication Title: 
Sudhoffs Archiv

The present paper summarizes our recent investigations of the so-called horse books from the High Himalayas in Nepal. These books are written in tibetan language and are essentially dealing with hippology and hippiatry and to a lesser extent with topics such as pharmacology, anatomy, methods of diagnosis, divination and magical practices for horse races. The therapeutic methods of treatment in tibetan veterinary medicine are guided by the concepts of human medicine which, on the one hand, are related to the Ayurvedic System, on other hand, to the Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Author(s): 
Maurer, P.
von den Driesch, A.
Publication Title: 
Sportverletzung Sportschaden: Organ Der Gesellschaft Für Orthopädisch-Traumatologische Sportmedizin

This paper reviews the literature and describes our experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of tendinitis in horses. Ultrasonography provides a sensitive tool to diagnose tendinitis and quantitate the degree of damage to the tendon; as well as provide differential diagnoses such as peritendinitis. The principles in therapy of acute tendinitis are: Immediate reduced exercise or rest, physical therapy to reduce inflammation and administration of local and systemic antiinflammatory drugs.

Author(s): 
Rapp, H. J.
Becker, M.
Heisse, K.
Stechele, M.
Publication Title: 
Tierärztliche Praxis

Ultrasonography must be used in combination with physical examination for the appropriate diagnosis of acute tendon injuries. Therapy should be designed to return the tendon to its normal function and appearance. Local and systemic anti-inflammatory agents, cold hydrotherapy and massage minimize excessive scar formation and progressively increasing tensile forces directs scar tissue to replace the tendon function.

Author(s): 
Rapp, H. J.
Heisse, K.
Becker, M.
Stechele, M.
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Equine Practice

This article introduces the importance of considering all related physical findings, evaluating the whole horse and determining the root cause in order to achieve the best treatment results, prevent recurrence, and return the patient to full function. The roles of shoeing, turnout, teeth, training aids and devices, compensatory lameness, working surface (footing), longing, ponying, hot walkers, and swimming are discussed in relationship to back dysfunction and rehabilitation. Postural analysis and measures for muscle and postural corrections are also presented.

Author(s): 
Ridgway, K.
Harman, J.
Publication Title: 
Equine Veterinary Journal

REASON FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Common methods used to treat back problems in horses need to be assessed objectively. OBJECTIVES: To measure spinal mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTs) and evaluate the effects of chiropractic, massage and phenylbutazone, compared with active and inactive control groups. METHODS: Baseline MNTs at 7 sites within the thoracolumbar and sacral regions were measured in 38 healthy mature horses exhibiting no clinical signs of lumbar pain.

Author(s): 
Sullivan, K. A.
Hill, A. E.
Haussler, K. K.
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Equine Practice

Manual therapy includes a diverse array of techniques, such as touch therapies, massage, physical therapy, osteopathy, and chiropractic, that were originally developed for use in humans and have been gradually applied to horses. All forms of manual therapy have variable reported levels of effectiveness for treating musculoskeletal issues in humans, but mostly only anecdotal evidence exists in horses.

Author(s): 
Haussler, Kevin K.
Publication Title: 
The British Homoeopathic Journal

Forty-one cases of Cushing's Disease affecting both equine and canine patients were treated with an identical mixture of two homeopathically prepared remedies (ACTH 30c and Quercus robur 30c), and the clinical improvements seen in the cases assessed. Homeopathy has been described as a medicine that can only be prescribed on the basis of individual symptoms shown, fitting the remedy to the patient, not the disease.

Author(s): 
Elliott, M.
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Equine Practice

The word nontraditional in the context of this article implies those modalities not normally taught in veterinary medical schools. This word has the same definition of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) as put forth by the Harvard medical school. CAM is a field of medicine that has enjoyed a recent increase in popularity in both human and equine medicine, particularly in regard to pain management. Some of the more recognized modalities include acupuncture, herbalism, and homeopathy.

Author(s): 
Fleming, Peggy
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Record

Twelve Faculty of Homeopathy veterinarians recorded data systematically at 777 consecutive homeopathic appointments for horses over a period of 12 months.

Author(s): 
Mathie, R. T.
Baitson, E. S.
Hansen, L.
Elliott, M. F.
Hoare, J.
Publication Title: 
The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Equine Practice

A thorough knowledge of equine spinal anatomy, biomechanics, and potential pathology is required to understand the principles and theories behind chiropractic and to apply its techniques properly. Chiropractic provides additional diagnostic and therapeutic means that may help equine practitioners to identify and treat the primary cause of lameness or poor performance. Specialized training in the evaluation and treatment of vertebral joint dysfunction and neuromusculoskeletal disorders places chiropractic in the forefront of conservative treatment of spinal-related disorders.

Author(s): 
Haussler, K. K.

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