Hospitals, Community

Publication Title: 
Origins

"While contemporary Catholic health care and other not-for-profit health care institutions excel in quality, innovation and technology, they remain community-benefit organizations, founded and sustained because of community need," Sister Carol Keehan, a Daughter of Charity who chairs the board of trustees of the Catholic Health Association of the United States, said in May 26 testimony in Washington before the House Ways and Means Committee, which conducted a hearing on the tax-exempt hospital sector. Keehan chairs the board of Sacred Heart Health System in Pensacola, Fla.

Author(s): 
Keehan, Carol
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

American hospitals were started by religious, ethnic and community groups to serve local health care needs. Immigration into the eastern cities and the constant movement west of the frontier required the creation of educational and service facilities to serve these populations and localities. In the nineteenth century, Catholic sisters went all across the country establishing schools and hospitals. They were motivated to care for the sick, establish charitable institutions and spread their religious beliefs. Their impact on the development of the American health system was enormous.

Author(s): 
Levin, Peter J.
Publication Title: 
Hospitals & Health Networks

While some hospital chains may seem like predators, that's not Quorum's style. The Brentwood, Tenn., system prefers to win friends and hospitals by highlighting its major strength: not-for-profit management.

Author(s): 
Serb, C.
Publication Title: 
Hospitals & Health Networks

While some hospital chains may seem like predators, that's not Quorum's style. The Brentwood, Tenn., system prefers to win friends and hospitals by highlighting its major strength: not-for-profit management.

Author(s): 
Serb, C.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery

This paper describes the development and evaluation of a holistic nursing department at a 261-bed conventional, community hospital. Through the holistic nursing department, a nurse visits hospitalized inpatients. The visit might include complementary and alternative modalities (CAM) therapies, such as relaxation techniques, therapeutic touch, aromatherapy, and therapeutic suggestion. Evaluation of visits occurred through a retrospective chart review and patient satisfaction surveys. Main outcome measures were patient satisfaction, physiological changes, and pre- and post-distress scores.

Author(s): 
Newshan, Gayle
Publication Title: 
Beginnings (American Holistic Nurses' Association)
Author(s): 
Martin, Margaret Ann
Publication Title: 
Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety

PURPOSE: Many patients use complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) for their health problems especially where long-term treatment is required. Epilepsy is the most prevalent neurological disorder requiring long-term treatment and compliance. The purpose of the study was to establish the pattern of use of CAM in epileptic patients. METHODS: 1000 patients with seizure disorder visiting the Neurology outpatient department were interviewed regarding use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) in the past.

Author(s): 
Tandon, M.
Prabhakar, S.
Pandhi, P.
Publication Title: 
Profiles in Healthcare Marketing

Parma Community General Hospital in Parma, Ohio, is called "the only successful independent community hospital in Cuyahoga County." It celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2001 by touting impressive statistics, such as growing to 339 beds now from 200 beds in 1962. Events to celebrate the anniversary included an employee celebration, the opening of a residential hospice center and a community prayer breakfast.

Author(s): 
Botvin, Judith D.
Publication Title: 
Profiles in Healthcare Marketing

Parma Community General Hospital in Parma, Ohio, is called "the only successful independent community hospital in Cuyahoga County." It celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2001 by touting impressive statistics, such as growing to 339 beds now from 200 beds in 1962. Events to celebrate the anniversary included an employee celebration, the opening of a residential hospice center and a community prayer breakfast.

Author(s): 
Botvin, Judith D.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: Official Journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to examine the religious characteristics of older medical inpatients with major and minor depression, compare them with religious characteristics of nondepressed patients, and examine their relationship to severity and type of depression. METHODS: Medical inpatients over age 50 at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) and three community hospitals were identified with depressive disorder using a structured psychiatric interview. Detailed information was obtained on their psychiatric, medical, and religious characteristics.

Author(s): 
Koenig, Harold G.

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