Hospitals, Military

Publication Title: 
Journal of Nursing Measurement

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The level of patient satisfaction is a result of a complex set of interactions between the patient and the health care provider. It is important to quantify satisfaction with care because it involves the patient in the care experience and decreases the potential gap between expected and actual care delivered. METHODS: We tested a preliminary 23-item instrument to measure patient satisfaction with general anesthesia care. The rating scale Rasch model was chosen as the framework. RESULTS: There were 10 items found to have sufficient evidence of stable fit statistics.

Author(s): 
Hawkins, Robert J.
Kremer, Michael J.
Swanson, Barbara
Fogg, Lou
Pierce, Penny
Pearson, Julie
Publication Title: 
Medicinski Pregled

INTRODUCTION: 90 years ago, on November 26th, 1917, died Dr. Elsie Inglis, one of the greatest heroines of the First World War, founder and driving force of the famous "Scottish Women's Hospitals", and one of the most interesting persons in the history of medicine in general, and especially in Serbia where she and her hospitals were of the greatest help in the most difficult times.

Author(s): 
Miki?, Zelimir
Publication Title: 
Psychiatric Medicine

This chapter will describe the use of clinical hypnosis in the military. As a result of the studies that were done during the Vietnam conflict, the relationship between post traumatic stress disorder and hypnotize ability was made. The author concludes that combat traumas enhance hypnotic potential in some veterans, and that veterans with excellent hypnotic potential begin to problem solve better preparing for a healthier post-war transition.

Author(s): 
Colosimo, C. P.
Publication Title: 
Malaria Journal

BACKGROUND: As a result of the widespread resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (including artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine) has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Intermittent preventive treatments with anti-malarial drugs based on sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are also given to children or pregnant women once per month during the transmission season. Since 2006, there have been very few reports on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs.

Author(s): 
Wurtz, Nathalie
Fall, Bécaye
Pascual, Aurélie
Diawara, Silmane
Sow, Kowry
Baret, Eric
Diatta, Bakary
Fall, Khadidiatou B.
Mbaye, Pape S.
Fall, Fatou
Diémé, Yaya
Rogier, Christophe
Bercion, Raymond
Briolant, Sébastien
Wade, Boubacar
Pradines, Bruno
Publication Title: 
Southern Medical Journal

BACKGROUND: This study of outpatients at a military medical center seeks to evaluate the extent that this population relies on religion and spirituality to cope with health-related stress. This study also assesses outpatients' desire for spiritual intervention in the context of their medical appointments. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a convenience sample of 670 outpatients presenting at a military medical center.

Author(s): 
McLaughlin, Sandra S.
McLaughlin, Andrew D.
Van Slyke, John A.
Publication Title: 
Military Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To survey soldiers, retirees, and spouses about their use and interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. METHODS: We used an anonymous, self-administered survey. RESULTS: Of 291 completed surveys, 81% used one or more CAM therapy. The most commonly used were massage and herbal/food supplements. The most common reasons were pain, stress, and anxiety. In addition, 69% wanted CAM therapies offered at the medical treatment facility (MTF), whereas 24% would pay for the services, and 44% were undecided.

Author(s): 
McPherson, Fujio
Schwenka, Mary Ann
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, types, perceived effects, and factors that influence the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by military children. DESIGN: A parent survey was administered in two military general pediatric clinics from June to September 2009. Parents completed surveys about their children including the following items: demographic information, a list of specific CAM therapies, family CAM use, and child health status. RESULTS: Caregivers completed 278 surveys. The overall use of CAM was 23%.

Author(s): 
Huillet, Adam
Erdie-Lalena, Christine
Norvell, Daniel
Davis, Beth Ellen
Publication Title: 
Military Medicine

This article reports on satisfaction associated with the introduction of chiropractic services within a military hospital, through a Canadian Armed Forces Pilot Project. We distributed a 27-item survey that inquired about demographic information and satisfaction with chiropractic services to 102 military personnel presenting for on-site chiropractic services at the Archie McCallum Hospital in Halifax, Nova Scotia. We provided a second 3-item survey, designed to explore referral patterns and satisfaction with chiropractic services, to all referring military physicians.

Author(s): 
Boudreau, Luke A.
Busse, Jason W.
McBride, Graeme
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