Hospitals, Urban

Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

This community health needs assessment-the first part of a mixed-methods project-sought to qualitatively examine the impact of the closure of St. Vincent's Catholic Medical Center, a large not-for-profit hospital in NYC, on individuals who used its services.

Author(s): 
Romero, Diana
Kwan, Amy
Swearingen, Justin
Nestler, Sue
Cohen, Neal
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health

This community health needs assessment-the second part of a mixed-methods project-sought to quantitatively determine the impact of the closure of St. Vincent's Medical Center, a large not-for-profit hospital in NYC on individuals who used its services. Findings from a community survey disseminated to the broader community affected by the closure of this hospital are described. The questions covered topics including demographics, health status, experiences accessing health care pre- and post-hospital closure, access to medical records, prescriptions, etc.

Author(s): 
Romero, Diana
Kwan, Amy
Nestler, Sue
Cohen, Neal
Publication Title: 
Medical Care

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have documented that hospitals decrease costs in response to reimbursement cutbacks. However, research concerning how this may affect quality of care has produced mixed results. Until recently, the ability to study changes in patient safety and payment has been limited. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine whether changes in 4 hospital patient safety indicator (PSI) rates are related to changes in the generosity of payers over time.

Author(s): 
Clement, Jan P.
Lindrooth, Richard C.
Chukmaitov, Askar S.
Chen, Hsueh-Fen
Publication Title: 
Malaria Journal

BACKGROUND: Zambia was the first African country to change national antimalarial treatment policy to artemisinin-based combination therapy--artemether-lumefantrine. An evaluation during the early implementation phase revealed low readiness of health facilities and health workers to deliver artemether-lumefantrine, and worryingly suboptimal treatment practices. Improvements in the case-management of uncomplicated malaria two years after the initial evaluation and three years after the change of policy in Zambia are reported.

Author(s): 
Zurovac, Dejan
Ndhlovu, Mickey
Sipilanyambe, Nawa
Chanda, Pascalina
Hamer, Davidson H.
Simon, Jon L.
Snow, Robert W.
Publication Title: 
Emerging Infectious Diseases

The simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi causes severe human malaria; the optimal treatment remains unknown. We describe the clinical features, disease spectrum, and response to antimalarial chemotherapy, including artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate, in patients with P. knowlesi malaria diagnosed by PCR during December 2007-November 2009 at a tertiary care hospital in Sabah, Malaysia. Fifty-six patients had PCR-confirmed P. knowlesi monoinfection and clinical records available for review. Twenty-two (39%) had severe malaria; of these, 6 (27%) died.

Author(s): 
William, Timothy
Menon, Jayaram
Rajahram, Giri
Chan, Leslie
Ma, Gordon
Donaldson, Samantha
Khoo, Serena
Frederick, Charlie
Jelip, Jenarun
Anstey, Nicholas M.
Yeo, Tsin Wen
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Community Psychology

Protective factors (hope, spirituality, self-efficacy, coping, social support-family, social support-friends, and effectiveness of obtaining resources) against suicide attempts were examined in economically, educationally, and socially disadvantaged African American women (100 suicide attempters, 100 nonattempters) who had experienced recent intimate partner violence. Significant positive associations were found between all possible pairs of protective factors.

Author(s): 
Meadows, Lindi A.
Kaslow, Nadine J.
Thompson, Martie P.
Jurkovic, Gregory J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

Spirituality has been identified as one component of a culturally competent therapeutic intervention for African American women. The present study was designed to investigate the ability of factors, such as level of hopelessness and the use of positive religious coping strategies, to predict spiritual well-being over time. Seventy-four low-income African American women were administered self-report questionnaires measuring hopelessness, use of religious coping strategies, and two domains of spiritual well-being.

Author(s): 
Arnette, Natalie C.
Mascaro, Nathan
Santana, M. Carmen
Davis, Shane
Kaslow, Nadine J.
Publication Title: 
Trials

BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain causes substantial morbidity and cost to society while disproportionately impacting low-income and minority adults. Several randomized controlled trials show yoga is an effective treatment. However, the comparative effectiveness of yoga and physical therapy, a common mainstream treatment for chronic low back pain, is unknown. METHODS/DESIGN: This is a randomized controlled trial for 320 predominantly low-income minority adults with chronic low back pain, comparing yoga, physical therapy, and education.

Author(s): 
Saper, Robert B.
Sherman, Karen J.
DeLitto, Anthony
Herman, Patricia M.
Stevans, Joel
Paris, Ruth
Keosaian, Julia E.
Cerrada, Christian J.
Lemaster, Chelsey M.
Faulkner, Carol
Breuer, Maya
Weinberg, Janice
Publication Title: 
Trials

BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain causes substantial morbidity and cost to society while disproportionately impacting low-income and minority adults. Several randomized controlled trials show yoga is an effective treatment. However, the comparative effectiveness of yoga and physical therapy, a common mainstream treatment for chronic low back pain, is unknown. METHODS/DESIGN: This is a randomized controlled trial for 320 predominantly low-income minority adults with chronic low back pain, comparing yoga, physical therapy, and education.

Author(s): 
Saper, Robert B.
Sherman, Karen J.
DeLitto, Anthony
Herman, Patricia M.
Stevans, Joel
Paris, Ruth
Keosaian, Julia E.
Cerrada, Christian J.
Lemaster, Chelsey M.
Faulkner, Carol
Breuer, Maya
Weinberg, Janice
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Emergency Medicine

This study examined the frequency of patients using alternative medicine to treat their condition before presenting to an emergency department (ED). This was a prospective randomized, consecutive survey conducted at a level I 24-bed inner-city trauma center. Patients were eligible for enrollment if they were at least 18 years old and able to consent. Exclusion criteria included patients delivered by an ambulance and patients unable or unwilling to consent.

Author(s): 
Zun, Leslie S.
Gossman, William
Lilienstein, David
Downey, LaVonne

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