Human Females

Publication Title: 
The psychologist's guide to an academic career

This chapter considers problems encountered by women and minority groups in pursuing academic careers. A major problem is that women and minorities are underrepresented in academia.To solve this problem, author proposes a direct, personal plan that enlists the efforts of those who are already in academia.

Author(s): 
Rheingold, Harriet L.
Publication Title: 
Canadian Psychology/Psychologie canadienne

Preferential hiring policies are often based on the erroneous assumption that if a designated group is not represented in an occupation or profession in the same proportion as it is represented in the population, then negative discrimination has taken place. In the school of discrimination-logic, no alternative explanations are considered. Not only is it asserted that the white male majority keeps women out by deliberate exclusion, but also by creating a climate in which women are uncomfortable.

Author(s): 
Kimura, Doreen
Publication Title: 
Journal of Educational Psychology

In the past 40 years, the proportion of women in science courses and careers has dramatically increased in some nations but not in others. Our research investigated how national differences in women’s science participation related to gender-science stereotypes that associate science with men more than women. Data from ?350,000 participants in 66 nations indicated that higher female enrollment in tertiary science education (community college or above) related to weaker explicit and implicit national gender-science stereotypes.

Author(s): 
Miller, David I.
Eagly, Alice H.
Linn, Marcia C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Educational Psychology

In the past 40 years, the proportion of women in science courses and careers has dramatically increased in some nations but not in others. Our research investigated how national differences in women’s science participation related to gender-science stereotypes that associate science with men more than women. Data from ?350,000 participants in 66 nations indicated that higher female enrollment in tertiary science education (community college or above) related to weaker explicit and implicit national gender-science stereotypes.

Author(s): 
Miller, David I.
Eagly, Alice H.
Linn, Marcia C.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry

Reviews the book, Aboriginal Woman by Phyllis M. Kaberry (see record 1940-06086-000). This book individualizes the woman of the tribe and affords a humanized conception of primitive woman as a social personality. It leaves aborigines no longer alien, gives us some idea of temperament and most secret ritual. The author has gone further than an anthropologist in her study. Contrary to ill-considered belief, she finds that aboriginal women are not subjected to the dictates of men, but their obligations are in conformity with the prevailing form of society.

Author(s): 
Wilson, Margaret T.
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