*Human Sex Differences

Publication Title: 
Integrating aging topics into psychology: A practical guide for teaching

Development continues throughout the life span. This basic precept of the life-span perspective apparently has not penetrated the discipline judging from the undergraduate psychology curriculum. In consequence of this missing concept, what often passes for a knowledge base on human behavior is, in actuality, an age-specific representation. Courses on the psychology of gender are no exception. Most textbooks designed for these courses rarely consider how gender issues are played out in later life.

Author(s): 
Bedford, Victoria Hilkevitch
Publication Title: 
Why aren't more women in science?: Top researchers debate the evidence

After providing an outline of the contents of this book, the chapter considers recent history relevant to the debate on women in science. It discusses the evidence-based grounds for a biologically based argument in a number of the essays in this volume. The chapter describes the need for this volume. The essays in this volume show that the pattern of sex differences is much more nuanced than their depiction in the popular media (e.g., male=right brain; female=left brain).

Author(s): 
Williams, Wendy M.
Ceci, Stephen J.
Publication Title: 
Why aren't more women in science?: Top researchers debate the evidence

Society is becoming increasingly scientific, technological, and knowledge-based, depending on the utilization and maximization of human talent and potential (Friedman, 2005). A nation's strength, both economically and civically, is now linked to what it can call forth from the minds of its citizens. Consequently, much attention is being focused on strategies for increasing the number of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals produced in the United States and possible untapped pools of talent.

Author(s): 
Lubinski, David S.
Benbow, Camilla Persson
Publication Title: 
Why aren't more women in science?: Top researchers debate the evidence

There are interesting differences between the average male and female mind. In using the word average, I am from the outset recognizing that such differences may have little to say about individuals. In addition, the differences are subtle and are to do with the relative proportions of different drives in the typical male and female mind. The field of sex differences in psychology in the 1960s and 1970s was so conflict-ridden as to make an open-minded debate about any potential role of biology contributing to psychological sex differences impossible.

Author(s): 
Baron-Cohen, Simon
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Work preferences, life values, and personal views of top math/science graduate students (275 men, 255 women) were assessed at ages 25 and 35 years. In Study 1, analyses of work preferences revealed developmental changes and gender differences in priorities: Some gender differences increased over time and increased more among parents than among childless participants, seemingly because the mothers’ priorities changed.

Author(s): 
Ferriman, Kimberley
Lubinski, David
Benbow, Camilla P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Diversity in Higher Education

In the United States, women tend to publish less than men do and to be overrepresented at the lower ranks of academia. This study examined the scientific productivity and career status of female and male psychology faculty in Italian universities. Psychology was selected as a discipline because for decades, it has had a female majority among its doctorates. Italy was the case study country because it has one of the highest representations of women among university faculty.

Author(s): 
D'Amico, Rita
Vermigli, Patrizia
Canetto, Silvia Sara
Publication Title: 
Journal of Educational Psychology

In the past 40 years, the proportion of women in science courses and careers has dramatically increased in some nations but not in others. Our research investigated how national differences in women’s science participation related to gender-science stereotypes that associate science with men more than women. Data from ?350,000 participants in 66 nations indicated that higher female enrollment in tertiary science education (community college or above) related to weaker explicit and implicit national gender-science stereotypes.

Author(s): 
Miller, David I.
Eagly, Alice H.
Linn, Marcia C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Educational Psychology

In the past 40 years, the proportion of women in science courses and careers has dramatically increased in some nations but not in others. Our research investigated how national differences in women’s science participation related to gender-science stereotypes that associate science with men more than women. Data from ?350,000 participants in 66 nations indicated that higher female enrollment in tertiary science education (community college or above) related to weaker explicit and implicit national gender-science stereotypes.

Author(s): 
Miller, David I.
Eagly, Alice H.
Linn, Marcia C.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Family Psychology

This study examined the relation between marital satisfaction and religious holiday ritual practices. 120 couples, married 9 years on average, completed measures of religious holiday practices (current family and family-of-origin) and marital satisfaction. Couples were interviewed about how important religion was to their family life. Marital satisfaction was related to religious holiday rituals beyond a global indication of religiousness.

Author(s): 
Fiese, Barbara H.
Tomcho, Thomas J.
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